Click on the appropriate links below:

I am three weeks into my recovery phase. The operation was a success and my mitral valve is repaired and working fine. My surgeon says that I've gone from a 2-year life expectancy to a normal life expectancy for a codger my age (69).

I'm told the recovery time will be 6 - 8 weeks and that seems about right. My mind isn't as clear as it normally is and that's because of the drugs I was given pursuant to the operation, which can take as long as 6 weeks to completely clear the system. Also the narcotic pain killer I've been taking doesn't help -- but I've been weening myself off of it and hope to discontinue using it by week-end.

I still get very tired so a sleep alot. Yesterday I got up and did a couple of hours work on computer. Same today. I hope by next week that I'll be able to get back to work on laying out the next issue of DP.

I've received many cards and emails from you and am very grateful for each one. Thank you.

November 19, 2014

 

About three weeks ago I found out that the heart murmur that I had for over ten years with no apparent side effects had gotten a lot worse in the last couple of months.  I am going in for open-heart surgery on Monday, October 27th to repair the mitral valve.  I will spend 4-6 days in the hospital and the total projected recovery is 4-6 weeks.  Unless I make a miraculous recovery I will miss seeing many of you at this year's Bouchercon.  I'll finish the current issue of DP as soon as I have regained sufficient strength.
I've been blessed with good health my entire life, so I just consider this "my turn" to have some medical problems.  I'm very confident that I'll come out of this experience with renewed vigor and strength.  All the best to you.  George

Oct 26, 2014

 

DP #74 is going to printer early next week. Sorry for the delay. It seems like each issue is delayed by some event in my life. Four years ago my wife and I bought a home to rent to our son and daughter-in-law (+ 3 grandchildren). They suddenly moved a couple of weeks ago and our time has been mostly spent driving 25 minutes each way and doing work in yard and house to get it ready for sale since this is the optimum time of year to sell a house. It would have been finished last week if not for that. Sorry. July 18, 2014

 

2014 Edgar Award Winners

Best Novel

ORDINARY GRACE by William Kent Krueger – Winner

SANDRINE’S CASE by Thomas H. Cook
THE HUMANS by Matt Haig
HOW THE LIGHT GETS IN by Louise Penny (Minotaur Books)
STANDING IN ANOTHER MAN’S GRAVE by Ian Rankin
UNTIL SHE COMES HOME by Lori Roy (Penguin Group USA – Dutton Books)

Best First Novel by an American Author

RED SPARROW by Jason Matthews – Winner

THE RESURRECTIONIST by Matthew Guinn
GHOSTMAN by Roger Hobbs
RAGE AGAINST THE DYING by Becky Masterman
RECONSTRUCTING AMELIA by Kimberly McCreight

Best Paperback Original

THE WICKED GIRLS by Alex Marwood – Winner

THE GUILTY ONE by Lisa Ballantyne
ALMOST CRIMINAL by E. R. Brown
JOE VICTIM by Paul Cleave
JOYLAND by Stephen King
BRILLIANCE by Marcus Sakey

Mary Higgins Clark Award

COVER OF SNOW by Jenny Milchman

Grandmasters

Robert Crais & Carolyn Hart

Raven Award

Aunt Agatha’s Bookstore, Ann Arbor, Michigan

Many thanks to Larry Gandle for calling from the Awards Ceremony May 1, 2014

 

2014 Barry Award Nominations

Subscribers and readers of Deadly Pleasures may vote by emailing their choices to george@deadlypleasures.com or by mailing them to P.O. Box 997, Bountiful, UT 84011. Deadline for voting is October 1, 2014. The winners will be announced at this year's Bouchercon (Long Beach, California) November 13 during its Opening Ceremonies.

Best Novel

A CONSPIRACY OF FAITH, Jussi Adler-Olsen
TAP ON THE WINDOW, Linwood Barclay
SANDRINE’S CASE, Thomas H. Cook
SUSPECT, Robert Crais
ORDINARY GRACE, William Kent Krueger
STANDING IN ANOTHER MAN’S GRAVE, Ian Rankin

Best First Novel

BURIAL RITES, Hannah Kent
JAPANTOWN, Barry Lancet
THE BOOKMAN’S TALE, Charlie Lovett
RAGE AGAINST THE DYING, Becky Masterman
COVER OF SNOW, Jenny Milchman
NORWEGIAN BY NIGHT, Derek B. Miller

Best PBO

JOE VICTIM, Paul Cleave
DISCIPLE OF LAS VEGAS, Ian Hamilton
THE RAGE, Gene Kerrigan
I HEAR THE SIRENS IN THE STREET, Adrian McKinty
FEAR IN THE SUNLIGHT, Nicola Upson
FIXING TO DIE, Elaine Viets

Best Thriller

DEAD LIONS, Mick Herron
GHOSTMAN, Roger Hobbs
RED SPARROW, Jason Matthews
THE SHANGHAI FACTOR, Charles McCarry
RATLINES, Stuart Neville
THE DOLL, Taylor Stevens

Another fine job done by our nominating committees comprised of Larry Gandle, Maggie Mason, Bev DeWeese, Ali Karim, Barbara Peters, Pat Frovarp, Gary Shulze, Mike Bursaw, Oline Cogdill, Kris Schorer, Beth Fedyn, George Easter and Steele Curry (on Thriller Committee).

April 16, 2014

 

The latest issue of DP (#73) goes to the printer tomorrow (Monday, March 3, 2014). Once again I'm late getting it out. I had the best of intentions. My wife scheduled a short 4-day trip to see her Dad in the Bay Area at the beginning of February. When I got home I was planning to blitz the magazine and get it out. We were home a day and 1/2 when we got a call from our Marine son saying his wife was in the hospital with pheumonia and that he couldn't find anyone to tend our grandchildren. We hopped a plane back to California where we spent the next 6 days tending until Ali got better. Finally got home and was making progress on the magazine when my daughter-n-law's mother died on the 21st. She got here in time to see her before the expected death (battled cancer for the last 1-1/2 years) but there ensued another week of tending while my Ali and Jordan took care of funeral plans and family time with visiting relatives. I finally finished it tonight and it will go to printer tomorrow. But I will be gone for the next week on a vacation my wife scheduled months ago (with non-refundable tickets) so it will not be mailed until Wednesday, March 12. I wish I had a backup editor, but when life interrupts (as it often does in my case, the DP schedule gets thrown off.) March 2, 2014

 

For the last few years the Crime Writers Association (U.K. crime writers) announce their nominations and winners of their Dagger Awards in two sections. The winners of the first section have been announced and the longlists (which will be shortened later this summer) of the second section are now available.

CWA Dagger Awards Part I

International Dagger Award
THE GHOSTS RIDERS OF ORDEBEC by Fred Vargas – Joint Winner
ALEX by Pierre Lemaitre – Joint Winner

THE MISSING FILE by D. A. Mishani
TWO SOLDIERS by Roslund & Helstrom
DEATH IN SARDINIA by Marco Vichi
THE COLLINI CASE by Ferdinand von Shirach

Ellis Peters Historical Dagger Award
THE SCENT OF DEATH by Andrew Taylor – Winner
THE HERETICS by Rory Clements
PILGRIM SOUL by Gordon Ferris
THE PARIS WINTER by Imogen Robertson
DEAD MEN AND BROKEN HEARTS by Craig Russell
THE TWELFTH DEPARTMENT by William Ryan

Dagger in the Library

Belinda Bauer – Winner
Alison Bruce
Gordon Ferris
Christopher Fowler
Elly Griffiths
Michael Ridpath

Diamond Dagger
Lee Child

---------------------------------------------

CWA Dagger Award Part II
These longlists will be whittled down to shortlists of four titles “later in the summer.” Larry Gandle will then read and review at least the Gold Dagger and John Creasey Shortlists.

Gold Dagger Longlist
RUBBERNECKER by Belinda Bauer
THE SHINING GIRLS by Lauren Beukes
TEQUILA SUNSET by Sam Hawken
DEAD LIONS by Mick Herron
RAGE AGAINST THE DYING by Becky Masterman
BREAKDOWN by Sara Paretsky
SAY YOU’RE SORRY by Michael Robotham
THE KINGS OF COOL by Don Winslow

Ian Fleming Steel Dagger (Best Thriller) Longlist
GHOSTMAN by Roger Hobbs
THE UNINVITED by Liz Jensen
THE NECESSARY DEATH OF LEWIS WINTER by Malcolm Mackay
RATLINES by Stuart Neville
THE SENTINEL by Mark Oldfield
THE POISON TIDE by Andrew Williams
CAPITAL PUNISHMENT by Robert Wilson

John Creasey Dagger (Best First Novel) Longlist
GHOSTMAN by Roger Hobbs
SOMETHING YOU ARE by Hanna Jameson
THE NECESSARY DEATH OF LEWIS WINTER by Malcolm Mackay
RAGE AGAINST THE DYING by Becky Masterman
NORWEGIAN BY NIGHT by Derek B. Miller
SHADOW OF THE ROCK by Thomas Mogford
THE CITY OF SHADOWS by Michael Russell
CITY OF BLOOD by M.D. Villiers

July 18, 2013

 

DP Issue #71 was mailed on Thursday, June 13, 2013. Now I can surface again and get all those things that I set aside to do later. I hope for quick delivery. 6/15/2013

 

EDGAR AWARD WINNERS 2013

Best Novel

LIVE BY NIGHT, Dennis Lehane (Morrow)

Best First Novel

THE EXPATS  by Chris Pavone (Crown Publishers)

Best Paperback Original

THE LAST POLICEMAN by Ben H. Winters (Quirk Books)

May 2, 2013

 

2013 BARRY AWARD NOMINATIONS


The winners will be announced September 19, 2013 at the Opening Ceremonies of Bouchercon 2013 in Albany, New York All subscribers and readers of Deadly Pleasures Mystery Magazine are eligible to vote. You may vote by email (george@deadlypleasures.com) or by sending your votes to P.O. Box 997, Bountiful, UT 84011.

Best Novel
GONE GIRL by Gillian Flynn (Crown)
THE BLACK HOUSE by Peter May (Silver Oak
TRUST YOUR EYES by Linwood Barclay (NAL)
DEFENDING JACOB by William Landay (Delacorte)
LIVE BY NIGHT, Dennis Lehane (Morrow)
DEAD SCARED by S.J. Bolton (Minotaur)

Best First Novel
THE YARD by Alex Grecian (Putnam)
A KILLING IN THE HILLS by Julia Keller (Minotaur)
SACRIFICE FLY by Tim O’Mara (Minotaur)
THE DARK WINTER by David Mark (Blue Ridge Press)
BLACK FRIDAYS by Michael Sears (Putnam)
THE PROFESSIONALS by Owen Laukkanen (Putnam)

Best Paperback Original
PAGO PAGO TANGO by John Enright (Thomas & Mercer)
MR. CHURCHILL’S SECRETARY by Susan Elia McNeal (Bantam)
BLESSED ARE THE DEAD by Malla Nunn (Washington Square)
THE OTHER WOMAN’S HOUSE by Sophie Hannah (Penguin)
BLOODLAND by Alan Glynn (Picador)
BENEATH THE ABBEY WALL by A.D. Scott (Atria)

Best Thriller
THE LAST REFUGE by Ben Coes (St. Martin's)
THE RIGHT HAND by Derek Haas (Mulholland)
THE FALLEN ANGEL by Daniel Silva (Harper)
A FOREIGN COUNTRY by Charles Cumming (St. Martin's)
HOUSE BLOOD by Mike Lawson (Atlantic Monthly)
RED STAR BURNING by Brian Freemantle (Minotaur)

You will notice that there are fewer categories this year. We have eliminated two: The Best Short Story (lack of interest/votes by fans) and Best British (changing times, most good British writers are now published in the U.S. and it was a confusing award especially when an American or an Icelandic won). The awards ceremony got to be too long. Now it will be just right.

The nominating committee for the first three categories is comprised of: Maggie Mason, Larry Gandle, Barbara Peters, Oline Cogdill, Ali Karim, Bev DeWeese, Beth Fedyn, Gary Shulze, Pat Frovarp, Mike Bursaw, Kris Schorer and George Easter. The nominating committee for the Best Thriller Barry is comprised of: Mike Bursaw, Steele Curry, Ali Karim, Larry Gandle and George Easter. Many thanks to them for their efforts. Another stellar job. 3/36/2013

   

 

The Edgar Award Nominations 2013

BEST NOVEL

The Lost Ones by Ace Atkins (Penguin Group USA – G.P. Putnam’s Sons)

The Gods of Gotham by Lyndsay Faye (Penguin Group USA – G.P. Putnam’s Sons)

Gone Girl: A Novel by Gillian Flynn (Crown Publishers)

Potboiler by Jesse Kellerman (Penguin Group USA – G.P. Putnam’s Sons)

Sunset by Al Lamanda (Gale Cengage Learning – Five Star)

Live by Night by Dennis Lehane (HarperCollins Publishers – William Morrow)

All I Did Was Shoot My Man by Walter Mosley (Penguin Group USA – Riverhead Books)

 
BEST FIRST NOVEL BY AN AMERICAN AUTHOR

The Map of Lost Memories by Kim Fay (Random House Publishing– Ballantine)

Don’t Ever Get Old by Daniel Friedman (Minotaur Books - Thomas Dunne Books)

Mr. Churchill’s Secretary by Susan Elia MacNeal (Random House Publishing– Bantam Books)

The Expats by Chris Pavone (Crown Publishers)

The 500 by Matthew Quirk (Hachette Book Group – Little, Brown and Company – Reagan Arthur)

Black Fridays by Michael Sears (Penguin Group USA – G.P. Putnam’s Sons)

 
BEST PAPERBACK ORIGINAL
 

Complication by Isaac Adamson (Soft Skull Press)

Whiplash River by Lou Berney (HarperCollins Publishers – William Morrow Paperbacks)

Bloodland by Alan Glynn (Picador)

Blessed are the Dead by Malla Nunn (Simon & Schuster – Atria Books - Emily Bestler Books)

The Last Policeman: A Novel by Ben H. Winters (Quirk Books)

THE SIMON & SCHUSTER - MARY HIGGINS CLARK AWARD

(Presented at MWA’s Agents & Editors Party on Wednesday, May 1, 2013)


Dead Scared by S.J. Bolton (Minotaur Books)

A City of Broken Glass by Rebecca Cantrell (Forge Books)

The Reckoning by Jane Casey (Minotaur Books)

The Other Woman by Hank Phillippi Ryan (Forge Books)

Sleepwalker by Wendy Corsi Staub (HarperCollins Publishers - Harper) 


These are the major nominations for crime fiction novels. There are other categories as well. To see them you may find them on the Mystery Writers Association website. January, 16, 2013

   

 

I've fixed the link to "Year's Best Mysteries" (above on the link bar) and updated the list to include all of the 2012 title. January 10, 2013

 

Here's a short list of my favorite reads of 2012 titles. I'm sure that I left something out, but this will be the bulk of them:

TALKING TO THE DEAD by Harry Bingham -- intriguing protagonist
KILL HER TWICE by Chelsea Cain -- my guilty pleasure. Well
written/plotted, but this series is often ultra-violent.
DEAD ANYWAY by Chris Knopf -- hopefully Chris' breakout book. Very clever
TRUST YOUR EYES by Lynwood Barclay -- will be featured in the cover
article of the next issue of Deadly Pleasures
DEFENDING JACOB by William Landay -- most heartbreaking book since
Lehane's MYSTIC RIVER
SAY YOU'RE SORRY by Michael Robotham -- this author never fails to
entertain me
THE PRISONER OF HEAVEN by Carlos Ruiz Zafon -- loved the first book in
this trilogy, didn't care for the second and loved this, the third,
which explained the connection between the first two books, which had
been puzzling to me.
STANDING IN ANOTHER MAN'S GRAVE by Ian Rankin -- his best in some time
and a Rebus to boot.
HUSH MONEY by Chuck Greaves -- lots of fun
SACRIFICE FLY by Tim O'Mara -- first novel with a lot of NYC attitude
THE DARK WINTER by David Mark -- first novel with a very sympathetic
detective/protagonist
PAGO PAGO TANGO by John Enright -- a BIG surprise. Wonderful writing
and very engaging story -- *my favorite of the year*. If possible,
listen to the audio version -- Phil Gigante's reading is masterful.
First novel set in Samoa.
BLESSED ARE THE DEAD by Malla Nunn -- excellent series with a wonderful
characters and very interesting setting -- Apartheid-era South Africa
THE FALLEN ANGEL by Daniel Silva -- always satisfying
A FOREIGN COUNTRY by Charles Cumming -- last two book have been
exceptional. In the forefront of the recent upsurge in espionage fiction
RED STAR BURNING by Brian Freemantle - second in an in-series trilogy.
Charlie Muffin is in my top ten favorite characters. January 10, 2013

 

The Edgar Award nominees are generally announced on January 19th to celebrate Edgar Alan Poe's birthday, but this year because that date falls on a Saturday, they will be announced a day or two early. I will post them as soon as they are announced. Larry Gandle is bird-dogging this for me. January 10, 2013

 

I'm putting the final touches on the layout of DP Issue #70 and hope to take it to the proofreader in a day or two. I thought that I would get it done during the holidays but I should have known better. Too much going on. Our Marine son Jordan and his family were here for over three weeks and whenever my adorable granddaughter Chloe is around I don't get anything else done. Jordan's wife Ali gave birth to Treven Taylor Easter on December 31, 2012. 8 lbs. 5 oz. and very healthy. A joyous time for us as a family.

I hope to mail the issue sometime next week. January 8, 2013

 

I just received a copy of James D. Doss's latest Charlie Moon mystery entitled THE OLD GRAY WOLF. I've been thinking about getting my set of Charlie Moon mysteries signed so I just happened to read the author bio on the back flyleaf of the dustjacket. It contained this pithy statement, "He died in 2012, shortly after completing THE OLD GRAY WOLF, the seventeenth novel in the series." It was the first notice I have had of this author passing and was saddened to read the news. October 29, 2012

 

2012 BARRY AWARD WINNERS

Best Novel

THE KEEPER OF LOST CAUSES (in U.K., MERCY), Jussi Adler-Olsen (Dutton) - Winner

THE ACCIDENT, Linwood Barclay (Bantam)
HURT MACHINE, Reed Farrel Coleman (Tyrus)
IRON HOUSE, John Hart (Minotaur)
HELL IS EMPTY, Craig Johnson (Viking)
THE TROUBLED MAN, Henning Mankell (Knopf)

Best First Novel

THE INFORMATIONIST, Taylor Stevens (Crown) – Winner

LEARNING TO SWIM, Sara J. Henry (Crown)
THE DEVOTION OF SUSPECT X, Keigo Higashino (Minotaur)
THE BOY IN THE SUITCASE, Lene Kaaberbol and Agnette Friis (Soho Crime)
TURN OF MIND, Alice LaPlante (Atlantic Monthly)
BEFORE I GO TO SLEEP, S.J. Watson (Harper)

Best British (Published in the U.K. in 2011)

DEAD MAN’S GRIP, Peter James (Macmillan) - Winner

NOW YOU SEE ME, S.J. Bolton (Bantam Press)
HELL'S BELLS (in U.K., THE INFERNALS), John Connolly (Hodder & Stoughton)
BAD SIGNS, R. J. Ellory (Orion)
THE HOUSE AT SEA’S END, Elly Griffiths (Quercus)
OUTRAGE, Arnaldur Indridason (Harvill Secker)

Best Paperback Original

DEATH OF THE MANTIS, Stanley, Michael (Harper Perennial) - Winner

THE SILENCED, Brett Battles (Dell)
THE HANGMAN’S DAUGHTER, Oliver Pötzsch (Mariner Books)
A DOUBLE DEATH ON THE BLACK ISLE, A. D. Scott (Atria)
FUN AND GAMES, Duane Swierczynski (Mulholland)
TWO FOR SORROW, Nicola Upson (Harper Perennial)

Best Thriller

THE INFORMANT, Thomas Perry (Houghton Mifflin) - Winner

CARVER, Tom Cain (Bantam Press)
COUP D’ETAT, Ben Coes (St. Martin’s)
SPYCATCHER (SPARTAN), Matthew Dunn (William Morrow)
BALLISTIC, Mark Greaney (Berkley Trade)
HOUSE DIVIDED, Mike Lawson (Atlantic Monthly)

Best Short Story (compiled by Marv Lachman)

Jeffrey Cohen, "The Gun Also Rises" (AHMM January-February) - Winner
Doug Allyn, "Thicker Than Blood" (AHMM September)
Mike Cooper, "Whiz Bang" (EQMM September-October)
Trina Corey, "Facts Exhibiting Wantonness" ( EQMM November)
James Powell, "Last Laugh in Floogle Park" (EQMM July)
Eric Rutter, "Purge" (AHMM December)

Don Sandstrom Lifetime Achievement in Mystery Fandom Award

Al Hubin


October 10, 2012

 

DP #69 was mailed September 24th. It should arrive at your doorstep soon. October 1, 2012

 

Just sent DP 69 to the printer. I should have it back by the beginning of next week when I will mail it out. The cover article is about Spy Fiction 2012 and features Stella Rimington. I hope that you will enjoy it. August 19, 2012

 

CWA Dagger Awards, Part II The Short List

The John Creasey (New Blood) Dagger
Heart-Shaped Bruise by Tanya Byrne, (Headline)
A Land More Kind than Home by Wiley Cash, (Transworld/Bantam)
Good People by Ewart Hutton, (HarperCollins)
What Dies in Summer by Tom Wright, (Canongate)

The Ian Fleming Steel Dagger

Dare Me by Megan Abbott (Picador)
A Foreign Country by Charles Cumming (HarperCollins)
The Fear Index by Robert Harris (Hutchinson)
Reamde by Neal Stephenson (Atlantic Books)

The Gold Dagger
Vengeance in Mind by N. J. Cooper (Simon & Schuster)
The Flight by M. R. Hall (Mantle)
The Rage, Gene Kerrigan (Vintage)
Bereft by Chris Womersley (Quercus)

August 29, 2012

 

CWA Dagger Awards, Part II

The Long Lists (I suppose that means that they will be whittled down prior to announcing the winners).

The John Creasey (New Blood) Dagger

The Doll Princess by Tom Benn (Jonathan Cape)
Heart-Shaped Bruise by Tanya Byrne, (Headline)
A Land More Kind than Home by Wiley Cash, (Transworld/Bantam)
So Much Pretty by Cara Hoffman, (Century)
Good People by Ewart Hutton, (HarperCollins)
Turn of Mind by Alice LaPlante, (Harvill Secker)
The Expats by Chris Pavone, (Faber & Faber)
What Dies in Summer by Tom Wright, (Canongate)

The Ian Fleming Steel Dagger

Dare Me by Megan Abbott (Picador)
The Shadow Patrol by Alex Berenson (Headline)
A Foreign Country by Charles Cumming (HarperCollins)
The Fear Index by Robert Harris (Hutchinson)
The Dispatcher by Ryan David Jahn (Macmillan)
Uncommon Enemy by Alan Judd (Simon & Schuster)
The Child Who by Simon Lelic (Mantle)
Reamde by Neal Stephenson (Atlantic Books)

The Gold Dagger


A Land More Kind than Home by Wiley Cash (Transworld/Bantam)
Vengeance in Mind by N. J. Cooper (Simon & Schuster)
Grandad, There’s a Head on the Beach by Colin Cotterill (Quercus)
The Flight by M. R. Hall (Mantle)
The Rage, Gene Kerrigan (Vintage)
Turn of Mind by Alice LaPlante (Harvill Secker)
The Child Who by Simon Lelic (Mantle)
Bereft by Chris Womersley (Quercus)

I've only read four of these, GOOD PEOPLE by Ewart Hutton, THE SHADOW PATROL by Alex Berenson, THE DISPATCHER by Ryan David Jahn, and A FOREIGN COUNTRY by Charles Cumming, all of which I liked. The Cumming is the best of the four. THE DISPATCHER is well-told, but a real downer of a story.

July 10, 2012

 

Macavity Award Nominations 2012

Readers International has announced it Macavity Award Nominations for 2012

Best Mystery Novel

1222 by Anne Holt, translated by Marlaine Delargy (Scribner)
CLAIRE DEWITT AND THE CITY OF THE DEAD by Sara Gran (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt)
THE HOUSE OF SILK by Anthony Horowitz (Mulholland Books)
THE RIDGE by Michael Koryta (Little, Brown)
A TRICK OF THE LIGHT by Louise Penny (Minotaur)
THE TWO DEATHS OF DANIEL HAYES by Marcus Sakey (Dutton)
HELL & GONE by Duane Swierczynski (Mulholland Books)

Best First Mystery Novel

LEARNING TO SWIM by Sara J. Henry (Crown)
NAZARETH CHILD by Darrell James (Midnight Ink)
TURN OF MIND by Alice LaPlante (Atlantic Monthly)
ALL CRY CHAOS by Leonard Rosen (Permanent Press)
THE INFORMATIONIST by Taylor Stevens (Crown)
BEFORE I GO TO SLEEP by S. J. Watson (Harper)

Best Mystery-Related Nonfiction

BOOKS, CROOKS AND COUNSELORS: How to Write Accurately About Criminal Law and Courtroom Procedure by Leslie Budewitz (Linden)
AGATHA CHRISTIE: MURDER IN THE MAKING: More Stories and Secrets from Her Notebooks by John Curran (HarperCollins)
WILKIE COLLINS, VERA CASPARY AND THE EVOLUTION OF THE CASEBOOK NOVEL by A.B. Emrys (McFarland)
THE SAVAGE CITY: RACE, MURDER, AND A GENERATION ON THE EDGE by T.J. English (William Morrow)
THE SOOKIE STACKHOUSE COMPANION by Charlaine Harris (Ace)

Best Mystery Short Story

"Disarming" by Dana Cameron (EQMM, June 2011)
"Facts Exhibiting Wantonness" by Trina Corey (EQMM, Nov. 2011)
"Palace by the Lake" by Daryl Wood Gerber (Fish Tales: The Guppy Anthology, Wildside Press)
"Truth and Consequences" by Barb Goffman (Mystery Times Ten, Buddhapuss Ink)
"Heat of Passion" by Kathleen Ryan (A Twist of Noir, Feb. 14, 2011)
"The Man Who Took His Hat Off to the Driver of the Train" by Peter Turnbull (EQMM, March/April 2011)

Sue Feder Historical Mystery Award

NAUGHTY IN NICE by Rhys Bowen (Berkley)
NARROWS GATE by Jim Fusilli (AmazonEncore)
DANDY GILVER AND THE PROPER TREATMENT OF BLOODSTAINS by Catriona McPherson (Thomas Dunne/Minotaur)
MERCURY’S RISE by Ann Parker (Poisoned Pen)
TROUBLED BONES by Jeri Westerson (Minotaur)
A LESSON IN SECRETS by Jacqueline Winspear (Harper)

 

 

Sorry for being absent for awhile. Getting the last issue out seemed to really take it out of me. Needed a break. DP#68 was mailed on June 8th, 2012. Some of you have received it already. I hope you enjoy it. Am going to lunch today with Mike Norman who is featured in the cover article. June 18, 2012.

 

Larry Gandle just called from the Edgar Awards Dinner with three of the Edgar Winners.

Best Novel

GONE by Mo Hayder

Best First Novel

BENT ROAD by Lori Roy

Best Paperback Novel

THE COMPANY MAN by Robert Jackson Bennett

Congratulations to the winners and thanks to Larry Gandle April 26,2012

 

My favorite crime novel of 2011 was Jussi Adler-Olsen's THE KEEPER OF LOST CAUSES (MERCY in the U.K.). It's sequel THE ABSENT ONE (DISGRACE in the U.K.) has been announced with an August 21, 2012 pub date here in the U.S. DP contributor Ali Karim has already received his British advance reading copy and has requested that a similar copy be sent to me, so you can imagine that I go to the mail box each day with much anticipation. It hasn't come yet, but I hope it arrives before we leave on Saturday for a short trip to see our son Jordan and his family in Oceanside, California.

Here is the plot of THE ABSENT ONE (DISGRACE): Kimmie's home is on the streets of Copenhagen. To live she must steal. She has learned to avoid the police and never to stay in one place for long. But now others are trying to find her. And they won't rest until she has stopped moving - for good.

Detective Carl Mørck of Department Q, the cold cases division, has received a file concerning the brutal murder of a brother and sister twenty years earlier. A group of boarding school students were the suspects at the time - until one of their number confessed and was convicted. So why is the file of a closed case on Carl's desk? Who put it there? Who believes the case is not solved?

A police detective wants to talk to Kimmie and someone else is asking questions about her. They know she carries secrets certain powerful people want to stay buried deep. But Kimmie has one of her own. It's the biggest secret of them all. April 5, 2012

 

In Award news, it has been announced that S.J. Rozan's GHOST HERO has won the Dilys Award from the Independent Mystery Booksellers.

The CWA has announced that this year's Diamond Dagger Award (lifetime achievement) will go to Frederick Forsyth, a very worthy recipient.

Also, the Thriller Award nominations are as follows:

Best Hard Cover Novel:

Joseph Finder - BURIED SECRETS (St. Martin's Press)
Jonathan Hayes - A HARD DEATH (Harper)
Stephen King - 11/22/63 (Scribner)
Michael Koryta - THE RIDGE (Little, Brown and Co.)
Marcus Sakey - THE TWO DEATHS OF DANIEL HAYES (Dutton Adult)

Best Paperback Original:

Jeff Abbott - THE LAST MINUTE (Sphere/LittleBrown UK)
John Gilstrap - THREAT WARNING (Pinnacle)
Helen Grant - THE GLASS DEMON (Delacorte Press)
Steven James - THE QUEEN (Revell)
John Rector - ALREADY GONE (Thomas & Mercer)

Best First Novel:

James Barney - THE GENESIS KEY (Harper)
Melinda Leigh - SHE CAN RUN (Montlake Romance)
Paul McEuen - SPIRAL (The Dial Press)
H.T. Narea - THE FUND (Forge Books)
Leslie Tentler - MIDNIGHT CALLER (Mira)

Best Short Story:

James Scott Bell - "One More Lie" (Compendium Press)
Michael Lewin - "Anything to Win" (Strand Magazine)
Twist Phelan - "Happine$$" (MYSTERY WRITERS OF AMERICA PRESENTS THE
RICH AND THE DEAD, Grand Central Publishing)
Tim L. Williams - "Half-Lives" (Dell Magazine)
Dave Zeltserman - "A Hostage Situation" (Ellery Queen Mystery Magazine)

April 5, 2012

 

January Magazine’s Best Crime Fiction of 2011

THE ACCIDENT, Linwood Barclay
A BAD NIGHT’S SLEEP, Michael Wiley
BAD SIGNS, R. J. Ellory
BLOODLAND, Alan Glynn
BURIED SECRETS, Joseph Finder
THE BURNING SOUL, John Connolly
THE CUT, George Pelecanos
A DROP OF THE HARD STUFF, Lawrence Block
THE END OF EVERYTHING, Megan Abbott
THE END OF THE WASP SEASON, Denise Mina
FALLING GLASS, Adrian McKinty
THE FATAL TOUCH, Conor Fitzgerald
FEAST DAY OF FOOLS, James Lee Burke
FIELD GRAY, Philip Kerr
THE FIFTH WITNESS, Michael Connelly
FOGTOWN, Andersen Gabrych and Brad Rader
FUN & GAMES, Duane Swierczynski
THE GENTLEMEN’S HOUR, Don Winslow
HEADS YOU LOSE, Lisa Lutz and David Hayward
THE IMPOSSIBLE DEAD, Ian Rankin
THE KEEPER OF LOST CAUSES, Jussi Adler-Olsen
LIAR’S KISS, Eric Skillman and Jhomar Soriano
PERFECT PEOPLE, Peter James
RANCHERO, Rick Gavin
THE RETRIBUTION, Val McDermid
THE REVISIONISTS, Thomas Mullen
SAN DIEGO NOIR, edited by Maryelizabeth Hart
THE SENTRY, Robert Crais
SPYCATCHER, Matthew Dunn
THICK AS THIEVES, Peter Spiegelman
THE THIEVES’ LABYRINTH, James McCreet
13 MILLION DOLLAR POP, David Levien
WHITE HEAT, M. J. McGrath
YOU’RE NEXT, Gregg Hurwitz

source: http://januarymagazine.com/crfiction/crfiction.html

This is a good list. Several of the titles were on the long lists for the Barry Awards (before they were paired down to six nominees per category). I see the hand of Ali Karim (who writes for January Magazine -- as well as Deadly Pleasures) in the list. March 14, 2011

 

Tom Cain's excellent novel CARVER is nominated for a Barry Award in the Best Thriller category. His novel has only been published in the U.K. to date and so he would like to make it available to American readers and subscribers of Deadly Pleasures. He has sent me the book as a pdf file which you may read on your computer or on an e-book reader or a tablet like Kindle, IPad, Nook, etc.

To receive your pdf of CARVER, just send me an email (at george@deadlypleasures.com) with "Carver" in the subject line. I will reply to the e-mail with your copy of the book as an attachment to the email. March 5, 2012

 

Dell Publications (Ellery Queen Mystery Magazine and Alfred Hitchcock Mystery Magazine) have once again been kind to supply texts of the Short Story Barry Award Nominations.  You may click on any of the titles below and read a fine short story. 


Doug Allyn, "Thicker Than Blood" (AHMM September)
Jeffrey Cohen, "The Gun Also Rises" (AHMM January-February)
Mike Cooper, "Whiz Bang" (EQMM September-October)
Trina Corey, "Facts Exhibiting Wantonness" ( EQMM November)
James Powell, "Last Laugh in Floogle Park" (EQMM July)
Eric Rutter, "Purge" (AHMM December)

March 5, 2012

 

There has been quite a lot of positive buzz about some new 2012 titles. Here are some books to look out for:

THE ORPHAN MASTER’S SON, Johnson, Adam (Random House, $26.00).  An epic novel and a thrilling literary discovery, The Orphan Master's Son follows a young man's journey through the icy waters, dark tunnels, and eerie spy chambers of the world's most mysterious dictatorship, North Korea.
THE SILENT OLIGARCH, Jones, Christopher Morgan (The Penguin Press, $26.00). Drawing on his decade of experience at the world's largest corporate intelligence firm, Jones leads readers down into the unvarnished realities of our time in the grand tradition of John le Carr. In this debut novel, a London intelligence agent pursues a money launderer to expose the dealings of a shadowy Russian oligarch. 
DEFENDING JACOB, Landay, William (Delacorte, $26.00).  Andy Barber has been an ADA in his suburban Massachusetts county for more than 20 years. He is respected in his community and happy at home with his wife, Laurie, and son, Jacob. But after a shocking crime shatters their New England town, Andy is blindsided by what happens next: His 14-year-old son is charged with the murder of a fellow student.
THE EDGE OF DARK WATER, Lansdale, Joe (Little, Brown, $25.99). May Lynn once dreamed of becoming a Hollywood star. Now she's dead, her body dredged up from the Sabine River. Sue Ellen, May Lynn's strong-willed teenage friend, sets out to dig up May Lynn's body, burn it to ash, and take those ashes to Hollywood to spread around. Only problem is, Sue Ellen has some stolen money that her enemies will do anything to get back.
AGENT 6, Smith, Tom Rob ( $25.99). Former secret police agent Leo Demidov is thrown into a foreign conflict and is forced to question and confront everything he ever thought he knew about his country, his family, and himself.
THE EXPATS, Pavone, Chris ( $26.00). Can We Ever Escape Our Secrets? Kate Moore is a working mother, struggling to make ends meet, to raise children, to keep a spark in her marriage . . . and to maintain an increasingly unbearable life-defining secret. So when her husband is offered a lucrative job in Luxembourg, she jumps at the chance to leave behind her double-life, to start anew. She begins to reinvent herself as an expat, finding her way in a language she doesn't speak, doing the housewifely things she's never before done--playdates and coffee mornings, daily cooking and never-ending laundry. Meanwhile, her husband works incessantly, at a job Kate has never understood, for a banking client she's not allowed to know. He's becoming distant and evasive; she's getting lonely and bored. Then another American couple arrives. Kate soon becomes suspicious that these people are not who they say they are, and she's terrified that her own past is catching up to her. So Kate begins to dig, to peel back the layers of deception that surround her. She discovers fake offices and shell corporations and a hidden gun, a mysterious farmhouse and numbered accounts with bewildering sums of money, and finally unravels the mind-boggling long-play con that threatens her family, her marriage, and her life. 
THE INQUISITOR, Smith, Mark Allen (Holt, $27.00). Geiger has a gift: he knows a lie the instant he hears it. And in his business—called "information retrieval" by its practitioners—that gift is invaluable, because truth is the hottest thing on the market. Geiger's clients count on him to extract the truth from even the most reluctant subjects. Unlike most of his competitors, Geiger rarely sheds blood, but he does use a variety of techniques—some physical, many psychological—to push his subjects to a point where pain takes a backseat to fear. Because only then will they finally stop lying. March 5, 2012

 

Changing the names of book titles when they come to the U.S. from foreign shores has always been a practice that frustrates the mystery reader/collector. The latest is Mark Billingham's GOOD AS DEAD (2011) which is being published here by the excellent Mulholland Books as THE DEMANDS (June 12, 2012).

But it is rare when the title is changed in the same country. Camilla Lackberg's fourth book came out in England as THE GALLOWS BIRD. Now, in a subsequent British edition, it is being called THE STRANGER. How strange! March 5, 2012

 

Remember your feelings as a young child when Christmas day finally came? Anticipation, excitement and wish fulfillment certainly characterized my day. I often compare aspects of my book collecting and book reading to Christmas coming to my house several times a year. My latest "Christmas" experience was when the advance reading copy of Brian Freemantle's RED STAR BURNING arrived on my doorstep. Freemantle's Charlie Muffin series is my favorite spy series of all-time and one of my all-time favorite series. I started reading this series in the late 1970s. I thought that when the Berlin Wall fell and spy fiction went into the dumper that Charlie Muffin would experience a similar fate, but Brian Freemantle found a way to keep him current and so sporadically (there was one ten-year gap) I would get a new Charlie M novel and rejoice.

Recently Brian sold Thomas Dunne/St Martins on the idea of a trilogy within the series. The first of the trilogy, RED STAR RISING, came out in 2010. The second, RED STAR BURNING, will be out in June, 2012, and the third -- who knows when, but I know that it is already written and submitted.

You would think that a series written over a 35 year period would lose some steam along the way. Not this one. Each book is as strong as the last. I can't recommend this series too highly.

A review of RED STAR BURNING will appear in the next issue of DP. 2/22/2012

 

The CWA has also announced the launch of its exciting new initiative The Crime Readers’ Association.

Crime and thriller fiction is booming worldwide with British and Irish writers shining alongside their American and Scandinavian counterparts. The newly formed CRA is a place for fans of these genres to keep up with their favourite CWA authors.

Crime fans are invited to visit a new website at www.thecra.co.uk and sign up to receive a free e-newsletter filled with features, news and articles about crime writing and CWA authors. If you sign up before the end of March, then you will go into a draw to win two free passes to Bristol’s CrimeFest in May this year. The first e-newsletter will feature an exclusive extract from Michael Ridpath’s new novel, a reading by current CWA Chair Peter James and exclusive crime features, together with news and updates from CWA members. This content will not be available elsewhere, so crime and thriller fans need to sign up now to receive it free.

The Crime Writers’ Association Chair Peter James said: “We’re very excited about launching this new initiative. The idea behind the CRA is to bring readers and writers closer together, in order to further promote the crime writing genre. Authors could not survive without their loyal readers and the CRA celebrates the role of the reader in the burgeoning success of the genre. We have showcased members’ events and books on our website for several years now and we see the CRA as an extension of this. Hopefully, it will help our members to grow their careers more.”
[Source: http://wwwshotsmagcouk.blogspot.com/] 2/22/2012

 

VOTING FOR THE BARRY AWARDS

Open to all "readers" of Deadly Pleasures. That would include subscribers, readers at a library or fans who buy a copy at a Mystery Bookstore.

How to Vote:

Send an email with your votes to george@deadlypleasures.com

Fax your votes to 801-296-1993

Mail you vote to DP-Barry Awards, PO Box 997, Bountiful, UT 84011

DEADLINE: September 1, 2012

VOTE EARLY!

 

 

I've gotten a lot of questions regarding the inclusion of THE DEVOTION OF SUSPECT X by Keigo Higashino in the Best First Novel category of the Barry Award Nominations. First of all, let me state that we (the Barry Award nominating committees) are quite flexible when it comes to the various categories. I was aware that Keigo Higashino has a body of work published in Japanese. I became aware rather late in the nominating process that he had a novel (NAOKO) that was previously published in the U.S., but it was described to me as more paranormal fantasy than mystery. In our minds, THE DEVOTION OF SUSPECT X was a first introduction to American readers of a Higashino mystery, so we included it in the category of Best First Novel and I'm glad I did for two reasons: 1. I'm not sure it would have made the cut in the Best Novel category, although it could have, and, 2. It's a really fine mystery and should be considered for an award. I'll understand if others disagree as to its inclusion, but to me it had the feel of a "first novel" and if it quacks like a duck, I'll consider it a duck. Since we don't limit the Best First category to American authors, it can often lead to confusion, especially when the first mystery published in the U.S. isn't the author's first book and/or first mystery in his/her own land. Feb 15, 2012
   

 

2012 BARRY AWARD NOMINATIONS
The Barry Awards will be presented October 4, 2012 at the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame during the Opening Ceremonies of the 2012 Bouchercon in Cleveland, Ohio.

Best Novel
THE KEEPER OF LOST CAUSES (in U.K., MERCY), Jussi Adler-Olsen
THE ACCIDENT, Linwood Barclay
HURT MACHINE, Reed Farrel Coleman
IRON HOUSE, John Hart
HELL IS EMPTY, Craig Johnson
THE TROUBLED MAN, Henning Mankell

Best First Novel
LEARNING TO SWIM, Sara J. Henry
THE DEVOTION OF SUSPECT X, Keigo Higashino
THE BOY IN THE SUITCASE, Lene Kaaberbol and Agnette Friis
TURN OF MIND, Alice LaPlante
THE INFORMATIONIST, Taylor Stevens
BEFORE I GO TO SLEEP, S.J. Watson

Best British (Published in the U.K. in 2011)
NOW YOU SEE ME, S.J. Bolton
HELL'S BELLS (in U.K., THE INFERNALS), John Connolly
BAD SIGNS, R. J. Ellory
THE HOUSE AT SEA’S END, Elly Griffiths
OUTRAGE, Arnaldur Indridason
DEAD MAN’S GRIP, Peter James

Best Paperback Original
THE SILENCED, Brett Battles
THE HANGMAN’S DAUGHTER, Oliver Pötzsch
A DOUBLE DEATH ON THE BLACK ISLE, A. D. Scott
DEATH OF THE MANTIS, Stanley, Michael
FUN AND GAMES, Duane Swierczynski
TWO FOR SORROW, Nicola Upson

Best Thriller
CARVER, Tom Cain
COUP D’ETAT, Ben Coes
SPYCATCHER (SPARTAN), Matthew Dunn
BALLISTIC, Mark Greaney
HOUSE DIVIDED, Mike Lawson
THE INFORMANT, Thomas Perry

Best Short Story (compiled by Marv Lachman)
Doug Allyn, "Thicker Than Blood" (AHMM September)
Jeffrey Cohen, "The Gun Also Rises" (AHMM January-February)
Mike Cooper, "Whiz Bang" (EQMM September-October)
Trina Corey, "Facts Exhibiting Wantonness" ( EQMM November)
James Powell, "Last Laugh in Floogle Park" (EQMM July)
Eric Rutter, "Purge" (AHMM December)

February 10, 2012

   

 

I just received the DP 67 from the printer so it will be mailed over the next two days. Thanks for your patience. February 8, 2012

 

I'm sorry to report the death of mystery writer Dorothy Gilman at the age of 88. For the past several years she had been suffering from Alzheimer's Disease. She was a favorite author of my mother and I have to admit that several decades ago I read and enjoyed the Mrs. Polifax series. Our condolences to her family. February 6, 2012

 

DP Issue 67 is at the proofreader now and I hope to get it to the printer on Monday. I had several problems with this issue (some of which I still have to figure out how to solve today), but the major one was the editor playing hooky. My son Jordan was here in Utah for a whole month during December and January (on leave from the Marine Corp) and I took every opportunity (and I mean every opportunity) to be with my granddaughter Chloe, with whom I am totally and completely enamored. Once Jordan, Ali and Chloe left, I went through a period of withdrawal, but now I'm fine. February 4, 2012

 

EDGAR AWARD NOMINEES 2012

BEST NOVEL
The Ranger by Ace Atkins (Putnam)
Gone by Mo Hayder (Grove/Atlantic)
The Devotion of Suspect X by Keigo Higashino (Minotaur)
1222 by Anne Holt (Scribner)
Field Gray by Philip Kerr (Putnam)

BEST FIRST NOVEL BY AN AMERICAN AUTHOR
Red on Red by Edward Conlon (Spiegel & Grau)
Last to Fold by David Duffy (Thomas Dunne Books)
All Cry Chaos by Leonard Rosen (Permanent Press)
Bent Road by Lori Roy (Dutton)
Purgatory Chasm by Steve Ulfelder (Minotaur)

BEST PAPERBACK ORIGINAL
The Company Man by Robert Jackson Bennett (Orbit Books)
The Faces of Angels by Lucretia Grindle (Felony & Mayhem Press)
The Dog Sox by Russell Hill (Pleasure Boat Studio - Caravel Mystery Books)
Death of the Mantis by Michael Stanley (Harper)
Vienna Twilight by Frank Tallis (Random House)

BEST SHORT STORY
"Marley's Revolution" (AHMM) by John C. Boland
"Tomorrow's Dead" (EQMM) by David Dean
"The Adakian Eagle" - Down These Strange Streets by Bradley Denton (Ace Books)
"Lord John and the Plague of Zombies" - Down These Strange Streets by Diana
Gabaldon (Ace Books)
"The Case of Death and Honey" - A Study in Sherlock by Neil Gaiman (Bantam)
"The Man Who Took His Hat Off to the Driver of the Train" (EQMM) by
Peter Turnbull (Dell Magazines)

THE SIMON & SCHUSTER - MARY HIGGINS CLARK AWARD
(Presented at MWA's Agents & Editors Party on Wednesday, April 25, 2012)
Now You See Me by S.J. Bolton (Minotaur)
Come and Find Me by Hallie Ephron (Morrow)
Death on Tour by Janice Hamrick (Minotaur Books)
Learning to Swim by Sara J. Henry (Crown)
Murder Most Persuasive by Tracy Kiely (Minotaur/ Thomas Dunne)

Commentary: Quite an eclectic list. Considering how many really, really good mysteries there were in 2011, I'd have to say that the Edgar committees missed a lot of good stuff. Larry Gandle is grumbling about reading the list for DP (which he has done every year for many years). I didn't care for Ace Atkins' THE RANGER, but did consider THE DEVOTION OF SUSPECT X a superior mystery novel. Philip Kerr is always good, but I didn't get around to reading FIELD GRAY. I didn't read any of the first novels or PBOs. I don't think there will be any similarity between the Edgar nominees and the Barry nominees this year. G. Easter January 19, 2012

 

Mystery fiction's oldest living old-timer still publishing is Elmore Leonard -- first book published in 1953. He's got RAYLAN coming out next week. If any of you have followed the excellent crime series on TV called Justified, you probably know that it is based on a short story by Elmore Leonard. The main character's name is Raylan, hence the name of the novel.

Danielle Bartlett at Morrow sent me the following email regarding a contest:

We’re running a cool contest on Killer Instincts this week for awesome Elmore Leonard swag in advance of the new book coming out next week.  We’re giving away seasons 1 and 2 of Justified on DVD and all of the Raylan Givens backlist – PRONTO, RIDING THE RAP, and FIRE IN THE HOLE.  Two additional winners will receive Season 1 of Justified on DVD.

I’d love if you could spread the word about the contest.  Here’s the link: https://apps.odylfarm.com/killerinstincts/Giveaways/2620

 If you have twitter, here’s a pre-worded tweet:

Love #Justified? Enter to win season 1 & 2 + @elmoreleonard books at http://bit.ly/z5M48A

Thanks!  The contest is live until Sunday night. January 13, 2012 

 

George Pelecanos submitted his latest novel, WHAT IT WAS, way ahead of schedule, so ReaganArthur Books decided to get it out well ahead of schedule (didn't even make it into their catalog) with a unique marketing package. The latest Derek Strange novel will be released on January 23, 2012 in three different formats: a slipcase hardcover for $35.00, a trade paperback for $9.99 and an ebook for the special price of 99 cents for the first month of publication and $4.99 after the first month. To me this appears as a marketing attempt to get George Pelecanos a wider audience, which he certainly deserves. Hope it works.

Plot of WHAT IT WAS: It’s Washington, D.C. in 1972 and Strange has left the police department and set up shop as a private investigator.  His former partner, Frank "Hound Dog" Vaughn, is still on the force. When a young woman comes to Strange asking for his help recovering a cheap ring she claims has sentimental value, the case leads him onto Vaughn's turf, where a local drug addict has been murdered, shot point-blank in his apartment. Soon both men are on the trail of a ruthless killer: Red Fury, so called for his looks and the car his girlfriend drives, but a name that fits his personality all too well. Red Fury doesn't have a retirement plan, as Vaughn points out - he doesn't care who he has to cross, or kill, to get what he wants. As the violence escalates and the stakes get higher, Strange and Vaughn know the only way to catch their man is to do it their own way.

January 13, 2012

 

It's a very, very sad day for me. I just received the news that Reginald Hill has passed away at the age of 75. He has been one of a handfull of my very most favorite authors since I first read RULING PASSION in the early 1980s. I considered Reginald Hill and Michael Connelly as the two greatest living mystery writers until today. The King is dead --- Long live the King. In retrospect I am very pleased that DP readers voted Reginald a Barry Award last year for THE WOODCUTTER. A fitting send-off for an exceptional artist.

I was hoping that he would be very long-lived and productive. Now I'll just have to satisfy myself with re-reading his most excellent body of work. I can only hope that there is a book in the pipeline. January 13, 2012

 

A common problem for many talented mystery/thriller writers is a lack of publicity or at least sufficient publicity that reaches the right people who can create word-of-mouth recommendations and advance a writer's career. One recent example is the Barry Award-nominated writer Derek Haas. He has written two excellent thrillers (THE SILVER BEAR and COLUMBUS) about a hit man who by the end of the second book wants to retire and live in peace with a woman he has fallen in love with. But he is afraid that there are forces that won't let him do that. (He's right.) Derek and his work should be more talked about, (and maybe it is -- in other circles) but I haven't noticed it yet. I'll see what I can do about that.

I just found out that there is a third book in the series (DARK MEN, Pegasus, $25.00, December 20, 2011) coming out shortly. I don't blame the fine people at Pegasus for my lack of knowledge (all publicists have an impossible job). But this seems to happen all too often to me. I think I'm on top of what's coming out and then -- Wham! A big surprise. "How come I didn't see that one coming out!"

To Derek's credit and that of his publicist, Gillian Smith, I had a copy of the book within a day of e-mailing him. And I read it in two days. See the upcoming issue for a full review. I liked it a lot and recommend this series quite highly. December 16, 2011

 

My assistant editor, Larry Gandle, laughs at me for being so "anal" in my book collecting. He has a point. For me, book collecting, is a passion and has nothing to do with logic or rationality. There's just something about holding a book of value in my hands that rings all of my bells.

That's not to say that I keep every book that I receive. Far from it. Every year I cull out books I know I'll never read and have little interest in keeping. Thrifts and a local used bookstore are the recipients of this "largesse." As are friends and neighbors who seem to count on me for their mystery reading -- especially their vacation books. Fortunately I have quite a few arcs and books left over after I send out the ones for review so that I always give my friends and neighbors the books and ask them not to return them. I never lend books from my 1st edition collection. That way I never have to go after a lent book which is embarrassing for both parties.

If it is a book I value, I hold onto it with a vice-like grip. And like most book collectors I always have a small Want List that I carry in my wallet so that if I run across a book that might complete a series of books I already have, then I snag it. For quite a long time the most important book on my Want List was the British 1st edition of Michael Connelly's first book THE BLACK ECHO.

You see, I have a complete set of Connelly's U.S. 1st editions, a complete set of his advance reading copies (the only author's arcs that I have collected) and a complete set of Connelly's U.K. 1st editions -- except THE BLACK ECHO. And it is a strange book. The "true" first edition is the U.S. edition, which generally sells for between $200 and $400. Copies of the U.S. edition are readily available. The U.K. edition, which was published after the U.S. edition, is a much rarer book, and hence, has commanded prices generally between $2,000 and $4,000, even though it isn't a true first edition. I always wondered how I was going to get that last elusive piece of my Connelly puzzle because I wasn't willing to pay that amount. Last year I tried to pry one out of the hands of a friend in the U.K., hoping that he was hard-up for money, but he said he was going to hold onto it as part of his "retirement plan."

Just by chance a couple of weeks ago, I noticed a copy on EBay for $400. It had a couple of minor defects (a slight spine slant, browning pages and a very small, almost unnoticeable water spot on the title page). It was good enough for me and I bought it, even though that's a lot to spend on a book. The dust jacket is bright and in very good condition. I can fix the spine slant with a book press I have. There's nothing I can do about the page browing because the book was printed on what appears to be very acidic paper. All in all, I am very pleased. It will be worth a lot more than its price when I get it signed, but I think it's major value will be as part of a complete set. So you see, Christmas has already come for me. Dec 16, 2011

 

I've been absent from the site for awhile. Just not a lot to say. There was a major typo on the cover of the latest issue. It states that Issue 66 is the Summer issue and it should have said the Fall issue. So disregard the season and just go by the number of the issue.

I've been hard at work getting Issue 67 out in 2011 to keep the post office happy. I've started to lay it out. The cover article is about relatives who write mystery thriller fiction -- either together or separately. Charles Todd will be on the cover.

December 16, 2011

 

From author Michael McGarrity:

Is it premature to tell you about my next book from Dutton, HARD COUNTRY , scheduled to be released in May 2012?  I hope not.HARD COUNTRYis a prequel to my Kevin Kerney novels and the first book in a trilogy. (I’m under contract with Dutton for the next two.)  If you visit my new and improved website, www.michaelmcgarrity.com, which was officially launched last weekend, you can read Chapter One, take a look at the great cover art, and visit the booksellers page where I feature a number of independently owned bookstores as well as link to the Independent Mystery Booksellers Association website.

To whet your appetite, here’s the Dutton Summer 2012 catalogue copy forHARD COUNTRY:

Michael McGarrity has crafted a richly authentic adventure of rough-hewn men and courageous women set in the hard country of the frontier American Southwest.

A tale of love and loss, survival and sacrifice, lawlessness and virtue,HARD COUNTRYis a rare and extraordinary story of one family’s struggle to settle and endure in the vast, untamed territory of New Mexico.

In the wake of the death of his wife as she gives birth to his son, and the killing of his brother on the West Texas Plains, John Kerney is forced to give up his ranch, leave his son behind, and strike out in search of the murdering outlaws and a place where he can start over. He drifts south, hiring on as a hand until he meets a man who offers him work trailing cattle to the New Mexico Territory that forever changes his life.

Spanning the years 1875 to 1918, HARD COUNTRYis as much about the expansion of a nation as it is about the search for love, lost family, and new beginnings in the harsh, sun-scorched, sand-blasted beauty of gypsum sands, black lava beds, and towering mountain ranges. It is an epic that infuses the tradition of the great Western novel with historically accurate settings and intelligently drawn characters. Packed with an honest portrayal of the people and events that set into motion range wars, Indian raids, cattle rustling, rough justice, long-standing feuds, murder, and the final closing of the frontier,HARD COUNTRYresonates with a hard-bitten, atmospheric reality. It is the Western reinvented and enlarged into an historic family saga that above all celebrates the people and the land of the great Southwest. October 14, 2011

 

DP #66 is at the printer. I feel like I've just gotten off a month-long rollercoaster ride. First was Bouchercon, which required a lot of preparation. I came home from that and tried to get as much of the issue done before my wife and I took off for 8 days in Hawaii, taking with me a rough draft of the issue which I proofread during that time. Then home again to a mountain of work waiting for me and the unexpected demise of our water heater. Now all I have to do is mail the issue when it arrives, which I expect will be the beginning of next week. The issue contains a report on Bouchercon, which was very enjoyable this year. Our private book signings went very well and I got to interact with a lot of wonderful authors. October 13, 2011

 

I promised a subscriber that I would post a photo of our newest granddaughter Chloe. This photo is my wallpaper on my computer and was taken in a 2-hour photo shoot that Grandma Easter arranged a couple of months ago. I just love it, so I hope no one objects to this personal aside on the website. I tickle her tummy every morning.

 

We have Bouchercon in St. Louis coming up this week. For those who are attending, Mystery Mike and Deadly Pleasures are sponsoring a number of "meet and greets/signings" with authors at Mike's tables in the Dealers Room. YOU DON'T HAVE TO HAVE A BOOK TO GET SIGNED TO COME AND TALK WITH THE AUTHOR. This will give fans a chance to meet and carry on a conversation in a more relaxed atmosphere than a formal signing line. Some are groups of authors such as the Barry Award winners and the Macavity Award winners whose names will be announced on Thursday night at the Opening Ceremonies. There are several writers (including our own Larry Gandle and Ali Karim) who contributed to the excellent non-ficiton work 100 BEST THRILLERS and who will be in attendance at Bouchercon. They have all been invited to one of our signing times. One of them, Raymond Benson, is even bringing some booze to give out (that should attract a crowd). There is a scheduled time for all attending Severn House authors. As you are probably aware I've become a big fan of this line, and will be pleased to meet some new authors to the line at our "meet and greet signing." We did not want to conflict with the formal signings of Bouchercon so most of our times are during the panel scheduling. This is an experiment to see how it goes, but if no one shows up at least Mike and I will have some quality time with some of our favorite authors. IF ANYONE WANTS TO CHAT WITH ME JUST LOOK AT THE FOLLOWING SCHEDULE AND I SHOULD BE AT ALMOST ALL OF THE EVENTS OUTLINED.

Location: Mystery Mike’s tables in the Book Room
Most signings will be for about 20 minutes unless author wants to stay longer or there is still a line
It’s a good opportunity to come by and spend more than 30 seconds with an author in an informal setting.
***Come even if you don’t have a book to get signed.

Thursday, September 14, 2011
9:00 (William) Kent Krueger, author of the Cork O’Connor series (NORTHWEST ANGLE)
10:00 Boyd Morrison, thriller writer (THE VAULT)
10:30 Mark Greaney, thriller writer of the Gray Man series (BALLISTIC)
11:30 Peter James (DEAD MAN’S GRIP)
2:30 Roger Ellory, literary crime writer (A SIMPLE ACT OF VIOLENCE)
4:00 Jonathon King, the Max Freeman series (MIDNIGHT GUARDIANS)

Friday
9:00 Anders Roslund & Borge Hellstrom, authors of THREE SECONDS
10:00 Deon Meyer, South African crime writer (THIRTEEN HOURS, TRACKERS) & Mike Lawson, political thriller writer (HOUSE DIVIDED)
10:30 Barry Award Winners (winners will be announced on Thursday night)
11:30 Zoe Sharp (FIFTH VICTIM) & Taylor Stevens (THE INFORMATIONIST), two of the best female thriller writers in the world
1:30 Ben Coes, thriller writer (POWER DOWN, COUP D’TAT) & Yrsa Sigurdardottir, Icelandic crime writer (THE DAY IS DARK)
2:30 Raymond Benson (THE BLACK STILETTO) & 100 Best Thriller writers
4:00 Macavity Award Winners (winners will be announced on Thursday night)
4:30 Chevy Stevens and Carla Buckley

Saturday
9:00 Terry Faherty, the Scott Elliott series (THE HOLLYWOOD OP) & Alan Jacobson, the Karen Vail series (INMATE 1577)
10:00 Matt Hilton, Joe Hunter thrillers (BLOOD & ASHES), & Gianrico Carofiglio, the Guido Guerrieri series (TEMPORARY PERFECTIONS)
10:30 Brett Battles, the “Cleaner”, Jonathan Quinn series (THE SILENCED)
1:30 Monette Michaels (Moni Draper) (THE DEADLY SEANCE)
4:00 Severn House authors
Adrian Magson (TRACERS)
Simon Wood (DID NOT FINISH)
Sandra Balzo (TRIPLE SHOT)
Robert J. Randisi (I’M A FOOL TO KILL YOU)
Sarah Shaber (LOUISE’S WAR)
Marcia Talley (A QUIET DEATH)
Diane Fanning (MISTAKEN IDENTITY)
Keir Graff (PRICE OF LIBERTY)
Clea Koff (FREEZING)

September 11, 2011

 

I was saddened to hear of the death of writer Paul Lindsay at the age of 68 from blood cancer. He was a former Marine and FBI agent. Most recently he had gained renewed popularity with the publication of two books under the pen name Noah Boyd (THE BRICKLAYER and AGENT X). He will be missed. September 11, 2011

 

It is with a very heavy heart that I report on the passing of Enid Schantz. For many years Enid and her husband Tom operated The Rue Morgue, a mystery bookstore in Boulder, Colorado and one of the most successful in the States. When they sold it a few years ago, they continued to successfully operate the Rue Morgue Press, publishing their favorite mysteries from the 1930s, '40s and 50's. They were a fixture in the bookrooms of many, many Bouchercons and Left Coast Crime conventions (they even put on at least one Bouchercon and one Left Coast Crime Convention). For many years Tom and Enid reviewed mystery fiction for the Denver news media.

I can remember gleefully buying Michael Connelly's THE BLACK ECHO from her in 1992. She was the one who gave me a short course on how to tell if a book was a first edition or not. I worked closely with them on the Denver Bouchercon because they twisted my arm to produce the program book. Where Enid was quiet and softspoken, Tom could often be bombastic. But it worked for them and they were an inseparable duo. My thoughts and prayers go out to Tom at this most difficult time. Enid will be sorely missed. August 11, 2011

 

BOOKS FOR SALE
I’ve wound up with some brand new British 1st editions (no defects) that I’m willing to sell at the very reasonable price of $25.00 per book plus $3.50 postage. E-mail your order to: george@deadlypleasures.com

The Denise Mina and the Stuart MacBride have sold.

A FEAR OF DARK WATER, Craig Russell. Jan Fabel returns to the Hamburg murder squad to track down a horrifying killer.

THE WATERMEN, Patrick Easter. 1st novel. In the dark and slimy streets of Wapping a prostitute is beaten half to death, a not uncommon fate in late 18th century London. So begins this gripping tale set in 1798 in the Port of London: a cruel villain holds sway over the underworld. His name is Boylin. His face is scarred by lime and his back by the two hundred lashes he received following a naval court martial. He holds Captain Tom Pascoe responsible for his suffering. They meet again when Pascoe becomes River Surveyor for the newly formed marine police. They've had orders to investigate a sudden fall in government revenue that is affecting the nation's ability to fight the war against Napoleon and stem the rising tide of Irish rebellion. Pascoe knows that Boylin is behind it, but he can't prove anything, yet.

THE LAST 10 SECONDS, Simon Kernick. 36 HOURS AGO: A brutal serial killer is arrested on the streets of north London after a two-year reign of terror. Known as the Night Creeper, he’s earned his reputation by torturing five young women to death.
24 HOURS AGO: Undercover cop Sean Egan has infiltrated one of the country’s most notorious criminal gangs. Now he’s about to risk his life in a desperate bid to bring its members to justice.
12 HOURS AGO: DI Tina Boyd has discovered that the Night Creeper’s murders are part of a much larger criminal conspiracy. But her quest for the truth has brought her into contact with some very dangerous people who want to silence her – permanently.
THE LAST 10 SECONDS: A man, a woman, a sadistic killer. As they race towards a terrifying confrontation only one thing is certain: they’re all going to have to fight very hard just to stay alive.

PRINCE, Rory Clements. Spring 1593. England is a powder keg of rumour and fear. Plague rages, famine is rife, the ageing Queen's couriers scheme: Elizabeth's Golden Age is truly tarnished. Meanwhile Spain watches and waits - and plots. Into this turmoil a small cart clatters through the streets of London, carrying a deadly load. It is the first in a wave of horrific bombing attacks on the Dutch immigrant community that will change John Shakespeare's life for ever.
Driven on by cold rage, Shakespeare's investigations will take him from magnificent royal horse races to the opulent chambers of Black Luce's brothel, from the theatrical underworld of Marlowe and Kyd to the pain-wracked torture cells of priest-hunter Richard Topcliffe, and from the elegant offices of master tactician Robert Cecil to the splintering timbers of an explosive encounter at sea. As Shakespeare delves ever deeper, he uncovers intricate layers of mystery and deception that threaten the heart not only of the realm, but of all that he holds dear.

REBELLION, James McGee. October 1812: Britain and France are still at war. France is engaged on two battle fronts - Spain and Russia - and her civilians are growing weary of the fight. Rebellion is brewing. Since Napoleon Bonaparte appointed himself as First Consul, there have been several attempts to either kill or overthrow him. All have failed, so far…
Meanwhile in London, Bow Street Runner Matthew Hawkwood has been seconded to the foreign arm of the Secret Service. There, he meets the urbane Henry Brooke, who tells him he’s to join a colleague in Paris on a special mission. Brooke's agent has come up with a daring plan and he needs Hawkwood's help to put it into action. If the plan is successful it could lead to a negotiated peace treaty between France and the allies. Failure would mean prison, torture and a meeting with the guillotine…


 

The winners of certain CWA Awards and the nominations for other CWA Awards was announced a couple of hours ago at the Harrowgate Convention.

International Dagger: Three Seconds by Anders Roslund & Börge Hellström
Non-Fiction Dagger: The Killer of Little Shepherds by Douglas Starr
Dagger in the Library: Mo Hayder
Short Story dagger: Homework by Phil Lovesey
Debut Dagger: Michele Rowe for What Hidden Lies.

The Gold Dagger Shortlist (not so short if you ask me)

Tom Franklin Crooked Letter, Crooked Letter (Macmillan)
Lucretia Grindle The Villa Triste (Mantle)
Steve Hamilton The Lock Artist (Orion)
Mo Hayder Hanging Hill (Bantam Press)
Michael Koryta The Cypress House (Hodder & Stoughton)
M. J. McGrath White Heat (Mantle)
A.D. Miller Snowdrops(Atlantic Books)
Denise Mina The End of the Wasp Season (Orion)

The John Creasey (New Blood) Dagger Shortlist

Conor Fitzgerald The Dogs of Rome (Bloomsbury)
Sam Hawken The Dead Women of Juarez (Serpent’s Tail)
Elizabeth Haynes Into the Darkest Corner (Myriad)
Erin Kelly The Poison Tree (Hodder & Stoughton)
Rosamund Lupton Sister (Piatkus)
Danny Miller Kiss Me Quick (Robinson)
SJ Watson Before I Go To Sleep (Doubleday)
Jason Webster Or the Bull Kills You (Chatto & Windus)

The Ian Fleming Steel Dagger Shortlist

Charles Cumming The Trinity Six (HarperCollins)
Frederick Forsyth The Cobra (Bantam Press)
Michael Gruber The Good Son (Atlantic Books)
Steve Hamilton The Lock Artist (Orion)
Chris Morgan Jones An Agent of Deceit (Mantle)
Craig Smith Cold Rain (Myrmidon)
SJ Watson Before I Go To Sleep (Doubleday)
Don Winslow Savages (William Heinemann)

Nice to see Steve Hamilton and S.J. Watson nominated twice. Liked both their books a lot.

July 22, 2011

 

 

A lot of authors are self-publishing short stories as e-books only (e-short stories only?). Brett Battles is successfully doing this. And now we have a big kahuna doing it -- Lee Child is releasing a Reacher e-short story entitled SECOND SON, which takes us back to Reacher's childhood before he became a BIG kid. It is being released on August 15th. I'm not sure what outlets other than amazon.com that will be selling it, but I'm sure that there are other sales points. July 21, 2011

 

DP#65 is done and I'm within hours of sending it to the printer. My Marine son, daughter-in-law and new granddaughter Chloe have been home on leave and I'm driving back to California with him on July 4th to help him move apartments. I'll be back on the 7th and I hope to mail the issue on July 8th. Sorry about the delay. This issue has been very difficult for me for some reason. I just couldn't get a block of time free to dive into it.

July 1, 2011

 

I'd like to recommend a British TV series now out on dvd in the U.S. and available at Netflix as well as other outlets. It is called Luther and is written by British crime writer Neil Cross. It contains six episodes that are very dark and intense. The lead character is a black, brilliant detective named -- wait for it -- Luther. The first episode of the show just won an Edgar Award for Best TV Episode. I believe it has shown on BBC America for those of you who get that cable channel. The second season of the show is in production now and should air in the fall. LUTHER: THE CALLING, a book based on the show and written by Neil Cross, is being published in August in the U.K. Nothing cozy about any of this, so be forwarned. May 15, 2001

 

Just read in Barbara Peters' Poisoned Pen newsletter that Robert B. Parker's SIXKILL, just out, is the last Spencer that he wrote entirely before his recent death. She also reported that the Spenser series iss to continue in the hands of mystery writer Ace Atkins. He's a fine writer but I can't help but wonder if it wouldn't have been better for the series if Parker hadn't left a book killing off Spenser to be published posthumously -- a la' Agatha Christie did with her Poirot and Marple series. May 15, 2011

 

The Edgar Award Winners

If I understand Larry Gandle's cryptic text message correctly, here are the winners:

BEST NOVEL
THE LOCK ARTIST by Steve Hamilton (Minotaur/Thomas Dunne Books) – Winner

CAUGHT by Harlan Coben (Penguin Group USA - Dutton)
CROOKED LETTER, CROOKED LETTER by Tom Franklin (HarperCollins – William Morrow)
FAITHFUL PLACE by Tana French (Penguin Group USA - Viking)
THE QUEEN OF PATPONG by Timothy Hallinan (HarperCollins – William Morrow)
I’D KNOW YOU ANYWHERE by Laura Lippman (HarperCollins – William Morrow)


BEST FIRST NOVEL BY AN AMERICAN AUTHOR
ROGUE ISLAND by Bruce DeSilva (Tom Doherty Associates – Forge Books) – Winner

THE POACHER’S SON by Paul Doiron (Minotaur Books)
THE SERIALIST by David Gordon (Simon & Schuster)
GALVESTON by Nic Pizzolatto (Simon & Schuster - Scribner)
SNOW ANGELS by James Thompson (Penguin Group USA – G.P. Putnam’s Sons)

BEST PAPERBACK ORIGINAL

LONG TIME COMING by Robert Goddard (Random House - Bantam) – Winner
THE NEWS WHERE YOU ARE by Catherine O’Flynn (Henry Holt)
EXPIRATION DATE by Duane Swierczynski (Minotaur Books)
VIENNA SECRETS by Frank Tallis (Random House Trade Paperbacks)
TEN LITTLE HERRINGS by L.C. Tyler (Felony & Mayhem Press)

BEST SHORT STORY
"The Scent of Lilacs" – Ellery Queen Mystery Magazine by Doug Allyn (Dell Magazines) – Winner

"The Plot" – FIRST THRILLS by Jeffery Deaver (Tom Doherty – Forge Books)
"A Good Safe Place” – THIN ICE by Judith Green (Level Best Books)
"Monsieur Alice is Absent" – Alfred Hitchcock Mystery Magazine by Stephen Ross (Dell Magazines)
"The Creative Writing Murders" – DARK END OF THE STREET by Edmund White (Bloomsbury)

April 28, 2011

 

It's time to vote for the 2011 Barry Awards. Deadline is this Saturday, April 30th.

Just e-mail your votes to george@deadlypleasures.com

Here are the nominees again.

Best Novel Barry Award

NOWHERE TO RUN, C. J. Box (Putnam)
CROOKED LETTER, CROOKED LETTER, Tom Franklin (Morrow)
THE LOCK ARTIST, Steve Hamilton (Minotaur)
MOONLIGHT MILE, Dennis Lehane (Morrow)
BURY YOUR DEAD, Louise Penny (Minotaur)
SAVAGES, Don Winslow (Simon & Schuster)

Best First Novel Barry Award

GUTSHOT STRAIGHT, Lou Berney (Morrow)
ROGUE ISLAND, Bruce DeSilva (Forge)
THE POACHER’S SON, Paul Doiron (Minotaur)
SHERLOCKIAN, Graham Moore (Twelve)
THE HOLY THIEF, William Ryan (Minotaur)
ONCE A SPY, Keith Thomson (Doubleday)

Best British Novel Barry Award

STARTED EARLY, TOOK MY DOG, Kate Atkinson (Doubleday)
BLOOD HARVEST, S. J. Bolton (Bantam Press)
THE WHISPERERS, John Connolly (Hodder & Stoughton)
THE WOODCUTTER, Reginald Hill (HarperCollins)
THREE SECONDS, Roslund & Hellstrom (Quercus)
FOURTH DAY, Zoe Sharp (Allison & Busby)

Best Paperback Original Barry Award

THE HANGING TREE, Bryan Gruley (Touchstone)
THE DEAD LIE DOWN, Sophie Hannah (Penguin)
EGGSECUTIVE ORDERS, Julie Hyzy (Berkley)
FEVER AT THE BONE, Val McDermid (Harper)
THE RHETORIC OF DEATH, Judith Rock (Berkley)
A SMALL DEATH IN THE GREAT GLEN, A.D. Scott (Atria)

Best Thriller Barry Award

13 HOURS, Deon Meyer (Grove Atlantic)
AMERICAN ASSASSIN, Vince Flynn (Atria)
THE BRICKLAYER, Noah Boyd (Morrow)
BOLT ACTION, Charles Charters (Hodder U.K.)
ON TARGET, Mark Greaney (Jove)
THE REMBRANDT AFFAIR, Daniel Silva (Putnam)

Best Short Story Barry Award

Mitch Alderman, "Requiem for Antlers" (AHMM Jan.-Feb. 2010)
Robert Barnard, "Family Values" (EQMM Feb. 2010)
Caroline Benton, "The Body in the Dunes (EQMM Jan. 2010)
Loren D. Estleman, "The List" (EQMM May 2010)
Terence Faherty, "The Seven Sorrows" (EQMM Mar.-Apr. 2010)
Ellen Larson, "When the Apricots Bloom" (AHMM July-Aug. 2010)

 

 

A couple of authors are coming out with e-book only short stories. C.J. Box's "The Master Falconer," a Joe Pickett short story, is now available at amazon.com and other e-book outlets for $2.99.

Barry Eisler's "Paris is a Bitch," a Rain/Delilah short story is also available at the same outlets for $2.99. The download will also contain the first three chapters of the upcoming John Rain book, THE DETACHMENT, which is being published as an e-book only. April, 28, 2011

 

Brett Battles has a new, excellent thriller out in his "Cleaner" series. It is a mass-market paperback original entitled THE SILENCED. Highly recommended. He also has joined the crowd of authors who are publishing some of their works as e-books only. LITTLE GIRL LOST can be purchased at most places where e-books are sold. It is $2.99 at amazon.com

I would like to read LITTLE GIRL LOST but I'm getting behind in all my reading and it is hard to keep up with it all, especially when one adds "e-books only" on top of the pile. For all the reported ills of the crime fiction publishing world, they still seem able to publish many more good books than I have time to read. April 7, 2011

 

LEFT COAST CRIME CONVENTION AWARDS

THE DILYS :IMBA loved selling the most
Louis Penny, BURY YOUR DEAD -- Winner
Colin Cotterill, LOVE SONGS FROM A SHALLOW GRAVE
Steve Hamilton, THE LOCK ARTIST
Dennis Lehane, MOONLIGHT MILE
Keith Thomson, ONCE A SPY
Don Winslow, SAVAGES

THE LEFTY: Best humorous mystery novel
J. Michael Orenduff, THE POT THIEF WHO STUDIED EINSTEIN -- Winner
Donna Andrews, STORK RAVING MAD
Laura DiSilverio, SWIFT JUSTICE
Donna Moore, OLD DOGS
Kris Neri, REVENGE FOR OLD TIMES' SAKE

THE BRUCE ALEXANDER MEMORIAL HISTORICAL MYSTERY: Best historical mystery novel, covering events before 1950
Jacqueline Winspear, THE MAPPING OF LOVE AND DEATH -- Winner
Rebecca Cantrell, A NIGHT OF LONG KNIVES
Robert Kresge, MURDER FOR GREENHORNS
Kelli Stanley, CITY OF DRAGONS
Jeri Westerson, THE DEMON'S PARCHMENT


THE HILLERMAN SKY AWARD: The mystery (short story to novel length) that best captures the landscape of the Southwest
Margaret Coel, THE SPIDER'S WEB -- Winner
Sandi Ault, WILD PENANCE
Christine Barber, THE BONE FIRE
Deborah J. Ledford, SNARE


THE WATSON: Mystery novel with best sidekick
Craig Johnson, JUNKYARD DOGS -- Winner
Sandi Ault, WILD PENANCE
Rachel Brady, DEAD LIFT
Chris Grabenstein, ROLLING THUNDER
Spencer Quinn, TO FETCH A THIEF

 

Thanks to Dell Publications I am able to post the six short stories nominated for the 2011 Short Story Barry Award. Just click on the titles below to read the stories:

Mitch Alderman, "Requiem for Antlers" (AHMM Jan.-Feb. 2010)
Robert Barnard, "Family Values" (EQMM Feb. 2010)
Caroline Benton, "The Body in the Dunes" (EQMM Jan. 2010)
Loren D. Estleman, "The List" (EQMM May 2010)
Terence Faherty, "The Seven Sorrows" (EQMM Mar.-Apr. 2010)
Ellen Larson, "When the Apricots Bloom" (AHMM July-Aug. 2010)

 

Issue #64 was mailed on Friday, March 18th. I hope you receive yours soon, but sometimes the Post Office can take up to a month to deliver certain issues. March 22, 2011

 

DP #64 went to the proofreader yesterday. Hope to send it to the printer by Friday or Monday at the latest. The cover article wherein most of the DP contributors write about their favorite recent and not-so recent books turned out great! I think you'll really enjoy it. It is almost 30 pages long, which made fitting in everything else quite difficult. I'm still trying to figure out how to cut 2 more pages to get down to the requisite 84 pages. March 9, 2011

 

DP contributor Maggie Mason and superfan Nancy Mitchell report on news regarding Raymond Chandler. Yes, Raymond Chandler! Who would think that the long-dead master of crime fiction would be making news in 2011?

Here’s a capsule account of what occurred.
“The ashes of Raymond Chandler's wife have been buried over his casket in a Valentine's Day ceremony in San Diego.
It had been the crime thriller writer's wish to be buried alongside Cissy Chandler, who died in 1954.
But because he left no instruction for what to do with her ashes after his death in 1959, it has taken more than five decades to bring them together.
More than 100 literary fans gathered on Monday to see a grave marker unveiled to commemorate their reunion.
"Everyone was thrilled," said historian Loren Latker, who found references suggesting Chandler wanted to be buried alongside his wife while researching the Anglo-American author.
With the help of John Wayne's lawyer daughter Aissa, he persuaded a Los Angeles judge in September to approve a reburial.
Cissy Chandler's ashes -- previously stored at a nearby mausoleum (in a shed with garden tools) - arrived in a caravan of vintage cars as a band played When the Saints Go Marching In.
A priest from St. James Episcopal in La Jolla (where both Ray and Cissy's funerals were held) presided over the ceremony at San Diego's Mount Hope Cemetery.


Guests included US actor Powers Boothe, who played Chandler's most famous creation, private eye Philip Marlowe, on television in the 1980s.
The character was memorably brought to life by Humphrey Bogart in the classic 1940s film adaptation of his novel The Big Sleep.”

Maggie and Mary attended and said that the ceremony was wonderful. Nancy (who is an expert on Raymond Chandler’s life in La Jolla, California) reports: “What a fabulous afternoon! The actor, Powers Boothe, spoke for a long time and read passages of Chandler that were wonderful. It would have been fabulous to have the program recorded. They brought Cissy’s ashes in wonderful old cars (see photos). First Loren Latker and Ann Lipscomb Hill, who arranged for this ceremony to take place, spoke, then the attorney (John Wayne's daughter) that filed the petition and got court approval to move Cissy spoke, then Judith Freeman who wrote about Raymond and Cissy spoke, then Powers Boothe (Marlowe in the movies) spoke for the longest time. Then the Episcopal Priest spoke. Then everyone went around the plot while the priest put her down into the hole and said prayers. All the time the Dixieland Band played wonderful songs. The lady on the keyboard is the daughter of a BIG mystery collector (Maggie knows him) and her father went to Raymond's original funeral.

They explained about her ashes being in a storage room with equipment at Cypress Cemetery. By law they could have thrown out the ashes after one year but they still had them after all these years. Lots of people dressed in period clothing which was wonderful. There were a large portion of the people from out of San Diego and out of State. There was a couple Maggie knows who flew down from San Francisco (Mystery writer Mark Coggins and his wife).
By the way, we saw Marlowe (Powers Boothe) leaning against his car waiting for the driver smoking a cigarette. Not being shy, we asked if it was appropriate for him to sign the program. Therefore we all got his signature on the program. "

Feb 16, 2011

 

I am pleased to announce the 2011 Barry Award Nominations

Thanks to all who participate on the nominating committees: Maggie Mason, Larry Gandle, Barbara Peters, Beth Fedyn, Bev DeWeese, Kris Schorer, Oline Cogdill, Gary Shulze, Pat Frovarp, Ali Karim, Mike Bursaw, Steele Curry and Marv Lachman.

Best Novel Barry Award

NOWHERE TO RUN, C. J. Box (Putnam)
CROOKED LETTER, CROOKED LETTER, Tom Franklin (Morrow)
THE LOCK ARTIST, Steve Hamilton (Minotaur)
MOONLIGHT MILE, Dennis Lehane (Morrow)
BURY YOUR DEAD, Louise Penny (Minotaur)
SAVAGES, Don Winslow (Simon & Schuster)

Best First Novel Barry Award

GUTSHOT STRAIGHT, Lou Berney (Morrow)
ROGUE ISLAND, Bruce DeSilva (Forge)
THE POACHER’S SON, Paul Doiron (Minotaur)
SHERLOCKIAN, Graham Moore (Twelve)
THE HOLY THIEF, William Ryan (Minotaur)
ONCE A SPY, Keith Thomson (Doubleday)

Best British Novel Barry Award

STARTED EARLY, TOOK MY DOG, Kate Atkinson (Doubleday)
BLOOD HARVEST, S. J. Bolton (Bantam Press)
THE WHISPERERS, John Connolly (Hodder & Stoughton)
THE WOODCUTTER, Reginald Hill (HarperCollins)
THREE SECONDS, Roslund & Hellstrom (Quercus)
FOURTH DAY, Zoe Sharp (Allison & Busby)

Best Paperback Original Barry Award

THE HANGING TREE, Bryan Gruley (Touchstone)
THE DEAD LIE DOWN, Sophie Hannah (Penguin)
EGGSECUTIVE ORDERS, Julie Hyzy (Berkley)
FEVER AT THE BONE, Val McDermid (Harper)
THE RHETORIC OF DEATH, Judith Rock (Berkley)
A SMALL DEATH IN THE GREAT GLEN, A.D. Scott (Atria)

Best Thriller Barry Award

13 HOURS, Deon Meyer (Grove Atlantic)
AMERICAN ASSASSIN, Vince Flynn (Atria)
THE BRICKLAYER, Noah Boyd (Morrow)
BOLT ACTION, Charles Charters (Hodder U.K.)
ON TARGET, Mark Greaney (Jove)
THE REMBRANDT AFFAIR, Daniel Silva (Putnam)

Best Short Story Barry Award

Mitch Alderman, "Requiem for Antlers" (AHMM Jan.-Feb. 2010)
Robert Barnard, "Family Values" (EQMM Feb. 2010)
Caroline Benton, "The Body in the Dunes (EQMM Jan. 2010)
Loren D. Estleman, "The List" (EQMM May 2010)
Terence Faherty, "The Seven Sorrows" (EQMM Mar.-Apr. 2010)
Ellen Larson, "When the Apricots Bloom" (AHMM July-Aug. 2010)

I'm setting an early deadline for voting: April 30, 2011. Bouchercon is a month earlier this year and I want to have plenty of time to invite winning authors who aren't signed up for Bouchercon.

February 8, 2011

 

A Personal Note From Vince Flynn
 
Win A Signed Copy Of Vince's Books

In November, at the end of my last tour, I was diagnosed with 
Stage III metastatic prostate cancer.  Just a few years ago, this diagnosis would have been a death sentence. Today, specialists are making great strides in the areas of hormone therapy and immune response, and there are several very promising drug trials that are changing the landscape of how prostate cancer is treated.

My treatments are working very well, and my near term prognosis is extremely good. In other words, I have more than a few Rapp novels left in me. My attitude is strong, and I feel better than I have in years. I am blessed to be surrounded by a wonderful wife, family, and great friends who have been extremely supportive. My faith has seen me through the darkest moments, and early on, when the diagnosis was not entirely accurate, things were very dark indeed. I am also blessed that I live in a part of the country that is known for great medical care. I have a wonderful group of doctors who are confident that I can beat this thing. For those of you who have gotten to know me, it will not be a surprise to you that this is a battle I do not plan on losing. As with any cancer, this is serious, but the good news is that I have lots of options for slowing this thing down, and then hopefully killing it.

I am currently working with Brian Haig on our joint novel and have started the next Rapp novel that should be out in October of 2011. Please keep me and my family in your thoughts and prayers, and I will try to keep you posted as things progress.

Keep the Faith,

Vince Flynn 

February 9, 2011

 

For some of the DP staff, John Connolly's THE GATES was their favorite novel of last year or near the top of their lists. He is coming out with a sequel. Here's what Declan Burke said on his blog about it:

"It’s shaping up to be a very interesting year for John Connolly, aka The Dark Lord, aka The One-Man Publishing Industry. First off, he publishes HELL’S BELLS, the YA novel sequel to THE GATES, which latter is as charming a slice of understated black comedy as you’re likely to read. Quoth the blurb elves:

Samuel Johnson – with a little help from his dachshund Boswell and a very unlucky demon named Nurd – has sent the demons back to Hell. But the diabolical Mrs Abernathy is not one to take defeat lying down. When she reopens the portal and sucks Samuel and Boswell down into the underworld, she brings an ice-cream van full of dwarfs as well. And two policemen. Can this eccentric gang defeat the forces of Evil? And is there life after Hell for Nurd?
 

Well, you’d have to say it’d be desperately unfair to tease us with the return of Nurd, and then not feature him at all in the novel, and potentially scarring for young readers to allow the forces of Evil to prevail. So, on balance, my answer to both questions is a cautious yes. The Big Q: will the novel feature any AC/DC lyrics? Only time, that perfidiously gravel-throated canary, will tell … "

This series is billed as a Young Adult series, but we've all found out that adults can enjoy it just as much. Feb 5, 2011

 

 

I'm a big fan of British TV crime dramas. Here in the U.S., we generally get the best of them a year or two after they appear in the U.K. and Canada. I found interesting this column in the lastest newsletter from the Whodunit mystery bookstore in Winnepeg, Canada:

"Mysteries on Television by Wendy
For those of us who like to mix watching mysteries with reading mysteries, there are some great shows to look forward to.
The Field of Blood based on the Denise Mina novel about a would-be journalist who becomes entangled in a murder case. Denise Mina is a little dark for me but I know she has many fans among our customers.
The BBC have made a six part series of Case Histories, the first in Kate Atkinson’s, Jackson Brodie series. The private eye is played by Jason Isaacs.
Vera, based on the novels of Ann Cleeves, featuring detective inspector Vera Stanhope. Macmillan have reissued a number of the titles in this series with covers showing scenes from the series. Brenda Blethyn plays the lead character.
The Suspicions of Mr. Whicher is based on the true-crime book by Kate Summerscale about murder in a Victorian country house.
I am really looking forward to the series based on Michael Dibdin’s Aurelio Zen novels. In part because I have been a fan of Rufus Sewell who plays Zen, since he appeared in the movie of Cold Comfort Farm. Shooting for this series, which starts with the second novel Vendetta, began in Italy last Spring. The series has just started on the BBC in the UK.
In the U.S. another of my favourites, Castle has been renewed for another season, starting in fall 2011." February 5, 2011

 

HAMMETT PRIZE NOMINEES 2011

From the International Crime Writers Association

Jonathan Eig, GET CAPONE: The Secret Plot That Captured America's Most Wanted Gangster (Simon & Schuster)
Tom Franklin, CROOKED LETTER, CROOKED LETTER(William Morrow)
T. Jefferson Parker, IRON RIVER (Dutton)
Olen Steinhauer, THE NEAREST EXIT (St. Martin's/Minotaur)

2011 DILYS WINN AWARD NOMINEES
The Independent Mystery Booksellers Association (IMBA) is pleased to announce this year’s nominees for the Dilys Winn award, given annually to the mystery titles of the year which the member booksellers most enjoyed selling. The Dilys Award is named in honor of Dilys Winn, the founder of the first specialty bookstore of mystery books in the United States. The award will be presented at Left Coast Crime in March.

LOVE SONGS FROM A SHALLOW GRAVE, Colin Cotterill (Soho)
THE LOCK ARTIST, Steve Hamilton (Minotaur)
MOONLIGHT MILE, Dennis Lehane (William Morrow)
BURY YOUR DEAD, Louise Penny (Minotaur)
ONCE A SPY, Keith Thomson (Doubleday)
SAVAGES, Don Winslow (Simon & Schuster)

February 5, 2011

 

Larry Gandle is one of my best friends, as well as being my Assistant Editor. Opposites attract -- he tries to keep me from being too positive about certain books and I try to keep him from being too negative. We're good for other that way.

We usually only get to spend a couple of days together per year at a mystery convention. But he is in nearby Park City today and I'm going up to spend the afternoon and evening with him and his medical buddies. He's in the midst of his annual reading of the Edgar Award nominees. He's finished the Best Novel category and thinks highly of Tom Franklin's CROOKED LETTER, CROOKED LETTER. It seems to be a concensus favorite and should be nominated for many awards.

We are in the final stages of the Barry Award nominations process and I should have the results for everything but the Barry Short Story Award sometime next week and I will announce them on this site at that time. We are getting them out a couple of months earlier this year so that we can invite winning authors to Bouchercon if they haven't signed up already. Last year, by the time I had the winners determined and invited the winning authors it was too late to change their schedules. We missed out on Alan Bradley, John Hart and Philip Kerr, all of whom said they would have attended if they had gotten notice earlier.

February 5, 2011

 

I was sad that Sarah Weinman has announced that her excellent website/blog Confessions of an Idiosyncratic Mind is on indefinite hiatus. This has been a primary source for my news of the mystery fiction world. But I can understand that Sarah's life has taken on a new direction and she won't have the time to devote to the blog. And I think she is a bit burned-out. I wish Sarah well with her writing and her new "almost full-time" job as the News Editor for Publishers Marketplace

She does recommend the following sites to visit: " The Rap Sheet, of course. Jen's Book Thoughts. Detectives Beyond Borders. Spinetingler. Crime Always Pays. Crimespot.net by virtue of aggregation. And the great Jiro Kimura's The Gumshoe Site, which I firmly believe will be the last crime fiction website standing, outliving everybody." I guess I'll have to get my news fix at one of these. Feb 5, 2011

 

This one looks interesting. HEADS YOU LOSE by Lisa Lutz and David Hayward (April, 2011). Plot: Meet Paul and Lacey Hansen: orphaned, pot-growing, twentysomething siblings eking out a living in rural northern California. When a headless corpse appears on their property, they can't exactly dial 911, so they move the body and wait for the police to find it. Instead, the corpse reappears, a few days riper . . . and an amateur sleuth is born. Make that two. Feb 5, 2011

 

Christmas comes twice a year to the Easter household. Once on December 25th and once whenever the latest Michael Connelly arrives on my doorstep, which this year was last Friday, January 21st (actually it comes more than that because there is the Reginald Hill and the Lee Child -- you get the idea). I usually devour the Michael Connelly in one or two sittings, but THE FIFTH WITNESS took me the entire weekend because of other commitments. It is an intriguing case for Micky Haller, the Lincoln Lawyer. It's release date of April 5th is scheduled to closely follow the release of The Lincoln Lawyer movie in March, 2011. Matthew McConaughey (not my favorite actor) plays Micky Haller and apparently does a good job. Larry Gandle says that Michael Connelly is very pleased with how the movie turned out. I've seen some movie trailers of it and if the movie is as good as the trailers, I think we are in for a treat and I may have to change my opinion of McConaughey. January 24, 2011

 

Left Coast Crime 2011 Award Nominations

Four awards will be given at Left Coast Crime's 22nd annual convention in Santa Fe, New Mexico. The winners will be selected by ballot at the convention. We are delighted to announce the nominees for books published in 2010:
 

The Lefty has been awarded for the best humorous mystery novel since 1996. This year's nominees, in alphabetical order, are:

  1. Donna Andrews, Stork Raving Mad (Minotaur Books)
  2. Laura DiSilverio, Swift Justice (Minotaur Books/Thomas Dunne Books)
  3. Donna Moore, Old Dogs (Busted Flush Press)
  4. Kris Neri, Revenge for Old Times' Sake (Cherokee McGhee)
  5. J. Michael Orenduff, The Pot Thief Who Studied Einstein (Oak Tree Press)

    The Bruce Alexander Memorial Historical Mystery Award, first awarded in 2004, is given for mystery novels covering events before 1950. This year's nominees are:
  1. Rebecca Cantrell, A Night of Long Knives (Forge Books)
  2. Robert Kresge, Murder for Greenhorns (ABQ Press)
  3. Kelli Stanley, City of Dragons (Minotaur Books)
  4. Jeri Westerson, The Demon's Parchment (Minotaur Books)
  5. Jacqueline Winspear, The Mapping of Love and Death (HarperCollins)
    The Hillerman Sky Award is a special award given this year, in honor of the convention's New Mexico location, to the mystery that best captures the landscape of the Southwest:
  1. Sandy Ault, Wild Penance (Berkley Hardcover)
  2. Christine Barber, The Bone Fire (Minotaur Books)
  3. Margaret Coel, The Spider's Web (Berkley Hardcover)
  4. Deborah J Ledford, Snare (Second Wind Publishing)

    The Watson is another special award given this year to the mystery novel with the best sidekick. The nominees are:
  1. Sandy Ault, Wild Penance (Berkley Hardcover)
  2. Rachel Brady, Dead Lift (Poisoned Pen Press)
  3. Chris Grabenstein, Rolling Thunder (Pegasus)
  4. Craig Johnson, Junkyard Dogs (Viking)
  5. Spencer Quinn, To Fetch a Thief (Atria)

 January 24, 2011

   

 

An interesting tidbit from The New York Times reporting on Stieg Larsson's partner's memoir:

Eva Gabrielsson, the longtime partner of the Swedish novelist Stieg Larsson, says in a new memoir that she wants to secure the rights to complete Mr. Larsson’s fourth novel in the “Millennium” series, which he was writing when he died suddenly in 2004.

According to Agence France-Presse, which obtained a copy of the memoir, scheduled for publication in France, Norway and Sweden next week, Ms. Gabrielsson says that she and Mr. Larsson “often wrote together.” “It is not my intention to recount here the plot of the fourth volume,” she writes in the memoir. “On the other hand, I want to say that Lisbeth little by little frees herself from her ghosts and her enemies.”

Mr. Larsson died several months before the first “Millennium” book, "The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo,” was published in Sweden but was said to have planned for 10 books in the series. Ms. Gabrielsson’s book (memoir) is scheduled for release in the United States in June, said her publisher, Seven Stories Press.

Editor's note: It has long been reported that Eva is in possession of Stieg's laptop that contained the unfinished manuscript of the elusive 4th book in the series, but that she wasn't going to do anything with it because under Swedish law she didn't have any rights to the book because she and Stieg weren't legally married. It looks like now she may be "negotiating" with Stieg's estate to get some literary rights to that 4th book. I just hope that it was close to being finished by Stieg before he died, so that a lot of it doesn't have to be written by someone else. January 24, 2011

 

The Great Recession is continuing to have a negative effect on mystery bookstores. Those that haven't gone out of business struggle competing against big chain discounting, the internet and now e-books. The LOS ANGELES MYSTERY BOOKSHOP is the latest to announce that it will be closing its doors at the end of this month.

One of the most successful mystery bookstores SLEUTH OF BAKER STREET in Toronto, Canada is downsizing by moving to a smaller store in March of this year. January 19, 2011

 

Edgar Award Nominees 2011

Here are the main fiction nominees:

BEST NOVEL
CAUGHT by Harlan Coben (Penguin Group USA - Dutton)
CROOKED LETTER, CROOKED LETTER by Tom Franklin (HarperCollins – William Morrow)
FAITHFUL PLACE by Tana French (Penguin Group USA - Viking)
THE QUEEN OF PATPONG by Timothy Hallinan (HarperCollins – William Morrow)
THE LOCK ARTIST by Steve Hamilton (Minotaur/Thomas Dunne Books)
I’D KNOW YOU ANYWHERE by Laura Lippman (HarperCollins – William Morrow)

BEST FIRST NOVEL BY AN AMERICAN AUTHOR
ROGUE ISLAND by Bruce DeSilva (Tom Doherty Associates – Forge Books)
THE POACHER’S SON by Paul Doiron (Minotaur Books)
THE SERIALIST by David Gordon (Simon & Schuster)
GALVESTON by Nic Pizzolatto (Simon & Schuster - Scribner)
SNOW ANGELS by James Thompson (Penguin Group USA – G.P. Putnam’s Sons)

BEST PAPERBACK ORIGINAL
LONG TIME COMING by Robert Goddard (Random House - Bantam)
THE NEWS WHERE YOU ARE by Catherine O’Flynn (Henry Holt)
EXPIRATION DATE by Duane Swierczynski (Minotaur Books)
VIENNA SECRETS by Frank Tallis (Random House Trade Paperbacks)
TEN LITTLE HERRINGS by L.C. Tyler (Felony & Mayhem Press)

BEST SHORT STORY
"The Scent of Lilacs" – Ellery Queen Mystery Magazine by Doug Allyn (Dell Magazines)
"The Plot" – FIRST THRILLS by Jeffery Deaver (Tom Doherty – Forge Books)
"A Good Safe Place” – THIN ICE by Judith Green (Level Best Books)
"Monsieur Alice is Absent" – Alfred Hitchcock Mystery Magazine by Stephen Ross (Dell Magazines)
"The Creative Writing Murders" – DARK END OF THE STREET by Edmund White (Bloomsbury)

I sent out the first phase of the Barry Award nominations last night. I come up with an initial list and the committee suggests additions and subtractions. On my initial list I have six of the same books that are nominated above. I usually have some snarky criticism of the Edgar nominations, but I can't complain this year. They are pretty good lists. January 19, 2011

 

I've finally gotten some free time. It seems like I've been on that I Love Lucy conveyer belt unable to keep up with the chocolates flowing out since before the last Bouchercon in October of last year. My goals are to catch up on reading (and I've been able to read some good books in the last couple of weeks) and to get the next issue of DP out in early February to get back on schedule. This next issue is like the one we did two years ago where the entire staff writes about their favorite books of the last two years, a book that surprised them and a favorite oldie that shouldn't be relegated to the Library of Lost Books. I've already gotten nine excellent submissions with four to go. It's my kind of article with lots and lots of suggestions for good reading. I think you will really like it.

As to recent reading, my favorite was the new Thomas Perry -- THE INFORMANT, which comes out in May, 2011. He returns with the Butcher's Boy who is living a quiet married life, as a retired assassin, with his wife in England. He is attacked and manages to kill the three men. Then he goes in search of who is behind the threat. I loved this book and read it in two sittings. His best novel in many a year. My reading experience was a bit different than normal because I downloaded the book as an e-book from a site called netgalley.com Reviewers and booksellers (who usually get publisher arcs) can now get some of those arcs as e-books by signing up at this site (not every publisher is represented on the site). Each download must be approved by the publisher, but if you are on their review lists already that is no problem. This will work for me, but not all of my reviewers so I'll still need the physical advance reading copies to send out to the DP staff, but Larry Gandle who also has a IPad is really grooving on this. The wave of the future. We might even save a tree.

I also read the two James Swain books mentioned a couple of posts ago (see below). They were very, very enjoyable reads. If you have been following the Tony Valentine series, you'll have to find a way to read them. If you don' t have an IPad or a Kindle, you'll have to borrow one from someone who has. January 14, 2011

 

 

Sad news. Two of my favorites in the mystery fiction field have passed on. The Grand Dame of mystery editors, Ruth Cavin, influential in the careers of so many of the current crop of mystery writers, succumbed to lung cancer at age 92. I would always enjoy chatting with her at Bouchercons. We had a long-running schtick: I would ask her what her favorite book was that year (that she edited). She would always reply with a twinkle in her eye, "I love all of my books and authors. They are all good. But you might want to try ..."

Also Joe Gores, nominated last year for the Barry Best Novel for his SPADE AND ARCHER, passed away at age 79 from a stomach hemorrhage. He is an Edgar-winner and was a working private eye before starting his writing career 40 years ago. I met him once at a Bouchercon and was immediately impressed at how cheerful and friendly he was. He also told great stories and he was someone with whom I wish I could have spent much more time. January 14, 2011

 

Merry Christmas everyone. Thanks for all your support in 2010.

Now for some news:

One of my favorite series is the Tony Valentine series by Jim Swain. There hasn't been one for a few years since Jim switched to the Jack Carpenter series in 2007. Mystery Mike (Mike Bursaw) called me this morning. He was quite excited with his find. Two new Tony Valentine books are out (JACKPOT and WILD CARD). That's the good news. The bad: they are Kindle-only books so their reading audience will be limited. $2.99 a piece. And there is also a new Jack Carpenter e-book as well. All are $2.99 per book.

There is a site for reviewers and booksellers to download advance copies of upcoming titles from various publishers. It is called www.netgalley.com. I've just signed up for it and downloaded a Steven Havill novel which I'm reading in anticipation of seeing him at this year's LeftCoast Convention. And I also downloaded the new Thomas Perry novel THE INFORMANT, which doesn't come out until May, 2011. It is a Butcher's Boy novel and I've already finished it. I simply couldn't put it down. I came to it with fairly low expectations since I hadn't cared too much for Perry's last two or three books, but I was very, very pleasantly surprised. It is one of his all-time best and I know I'm going to give it an A rating. What I'm considering is an A+ , which I haven't given any book for quite some time.

In England, in March, 2011 a first novel/historical mystery entitled THE WATERMEN is being published. It caught my eye because the author's name is Patrick Easter. A review copy is on it way to me. Hope it is good. Don't want to give a negative review to someone with the same patronym.

Plot: A gripping tale set in 1798 in the Port of London: a cruel villain holds sway over the underworld. His name is Boylin. His face is scarred by lime and his back by the two hundred lashes he received following a naval court martial. He holds Captain Tom Pascoe responsible for his suffering. They meet again when Pascoe becomes River Surveyor for the newly formed marine police. They've had orders to investigate a sudden fall in government revenue that is affecting the nation's ability to fight the war against Napoleon and stem the rising tide of Irish rebellion. Pascoe knows that Boylin is behind it, but he can't prove anything, yet. THE WATERMEN follows these two adversaries across London as they try to outwit one another.

2011 promises to be an excellent year in crime fiction if THE INFORMANT is any indication. December 23, 2010

 

 

The best mystery/crime novels of 2010 lists are starting to appear. Here are a few:

Kirkus Reviews Best Mysteries of 2010

C.J. Box, NOWHERE TO RUN
Noah Boyd, THE BRICK LAYER
James Lee Burke, THE GLASS RAINBOW
Lee Child, WORTH DYING FOR
Jeffery Deaver, EDGE
Paul Doiron, THE POACHER’S SON
Elly Griffiths, THE CROSSING PLACES
Elly Griffiths, THE JANUS STONE
Bryan Gruley, THE HANGING TREE
Charles Kipps, CRYSTAL DEATH
Alexander McCall Smith, THE CHARMING QUIRKS OF OTHERS
Louise Penny, BURY YOUR DEAD
Chevy Stevens, STILL MISSING
Wallace Stroby, GONE ‘TIL NOVEMBER
Inger Ash Wolfe, THE TAKEN

Library Journal Best Mysteries of 2010

Casey, Kathryn. THE KILLING STORM. Minotaur: St. Martin’s. $25.99. As Texas Ranger Sarah Armstrong investigates the ritualistic killings of prize cattle, a four-year-old boy is kidnapped, and a hurricane heads straight for Houston. Riveting suspense and nifty plot twists in an outstanding series. (LJ 10/1/10)
Elias, Gerald. DANSE MACABRE. Minotaur: St. Martin’s. $24.99. The execution of a man convicted of killing a famous concert violinist draws blind violin teacher Daniel Jacobus into an impromptu investigation. Musical know-how, an intricate plot, and fresh characters elevate Elias’s second series title above standard fare. (LJ 7/10)
Harris, Gardiner. HAZARD. Minotaur: St. Martin’s. $25.99. A safety inspector probes a fatal mining disaster in Hazard, KY, that may not have been an accident. This outstanding debut boasts vivid details, insider knowledge of the mining industry, spot-on characterizations, and an engrossing mystery. (LJ 1/10)
Larsen, K.J. LIAR, LIAR: A Cat DeLuca Mystery. Poisoned Pen.$24.95; trade paper. $14.95. Cat DeLuca, owner of Chicago’s Pants on Fire Detective Agency, is up to her eyebrows in trouble when she tries to prove a man’s infidelity. Her family of police officers and busybody relatives add comic relief in this cozy debut. (LJ 8/10)
Parker, I.J. THE MASUDA AFFAIR: A Sugawara Akitada Novel. Severn House. $28.95. Sugawara attempts to help an abused boy, reconnect with his wife, come to terms with the death of a son, and solve a murder. Eleventh-century Japan is a perfect setting for this perceptive sleuth and complex crime novel. (LJ 11/1/10)

Publisher’s Weekly Best Mysteries 2010
THE MAN WITH THE BALTIC STARE, James Church (Minotaur). Church audaciously sets his fourth Inspector O novel in 2016, when O must investigate a Macao prostitute’s murder linked to the young man being groomed as the future leader of North Korea.
LOVE SONGS FROM A SHALLOW GRAVE, Colin Cotterill (Soho Crime). The murders of three women, each with a dueling sword, preoccupy 73-year-old Laotian coroner Siri Paiboun in a mystery that has it all-a heroic protagonist, a challenging puzzle, and an exotic setting.
BLEED A RIVER DEEP, Brian McGilloway (Minotaur). Despite being suspended from the Garda for failing to prevent what could have been the fatal shooting of a visiting former U.S. senator, Irish Inspector Devlin persists in looking into a bank heist and other crimes in a mystery that explores the underside of the “Celtic Tiger.”
BURY YOUR DEAD, Louise Penny (Minotaur) Penny’s gift for displaying heartbreak and hope in the same scene is just one of the many strengths of her sixth traditional mystery to feature French-Canadian Chief Insp. Armand Gamache.
THE INSANE TRAIN, Sheldon Russell (Minotaur). Railroad security agent Hook Runyon must help transport a trainload of dangerous mental patients from California to Oklahoma in a rough-edged 1940s historical that evokes both Chandler and Hammett.
THE RED DOOR, Charles Todd (Morrow).Scotland Yard inspector Ian Rutledge, a shell-shocked WWI veteran, looks into a missing missionary and a bludgeoning . 12/16/2010

 

I'm sending DP63 to the printer this morning and hope to mail it later this week. Sorry for the delay, but life has not been co-operating lately. The roller-coaster didn't stop after the wedding. Will try to get the next issue out sooner than three months from now to catch up.

As I got to the end of the issue I discovered that I had left out the Recent Paperbacks of Note column and rather than go back and re-arrange and delete other columns I decided to publish that column on this site for now. I will include it in the next issue along with updates. To see it, go to: Recent Paperbacks of Note

December 13, 2010

 

 

Well, the roller-coaster I've been on for about the last 2-1/2 weeks is just about over. First there was Bouchercon, then my son's graduation from Marine Boot Camp, then all the activities surrounding his wedding last Monday. Michele and I are very proud of him and very happy about his choice in a bride. All went well, but I'm somewhat exhausted. Now to get Issue 63 out!

 

I've been hearing rumors that I was in a video about Lee Child that appeared on the CBS Sunday Morning show, so this morning I finally got around to checking it out.

The rumors were correct. I can be found about 1/3 of the way through the video. No speaking role. See if you can spot me: http://www.cbsnews.com/video/watch/?id=6987175n&tag=related;photovideo

10/29/2010

 

Just back from Bouchercon. San Francisco was wonderful -- the convention well-run, so congratulations to the committee and to Rae Helmsworth. The hotel was spacious and well-suited for a Bouchercon crowd. I will provide a more detailed report soon. Here are the award winners:

BARRY AWARD WINNERS 2010

BEST NOVEL
John Hart, THE LAST CHILD, Minotaur – Winner
John Connolly, THE GATES, Atria
David Ellis, THE HIDDEN MAN, Putnam
Joe Gores, SPADE & ARCHER, Knopf
Marcia Muller, LOCKED IN, Grand Central
S.J. Rozan, SHANGHAI MOON, Minotaur

BEST FIRST NOVEL
Alan Bradley, THE SWEETNESS AT THE BOTTOM OF THE PIE, Delacorte – Winner
Josh Bazell, BEAT THE REAPER, Little, Brown
Rebecca Cantrell, A TRACE OF SMOKE, Forge
Sophie Littlefield, A BAD DAY FOR SORRY, Minotaur
Attica Locke, BLACK WATER RISING, Harper
Stuart Neville, THE GHOSTS OF BELFAST (THE TWELVE), Soho Crime

BEST BRITISH NOVEL
Philip Kerr, IF THE DEAD RISE NOT, Quercus – Winner
S. J. Bolton, AWAKENING, Bantam Press
John Connolly, THE LOVERS, HodderStoughton
Reginald Hill, MIDNIGHT FUGUE, HarperCollins
Denise Mina, STILL MIDNIGHT, Orion
Robert Wilson, IGNORANCE OF BLOOD, HarperCollins

BEST PAPERBACK ORIGINAL
Bryan Gruley, STARVATION LAKE, Touchstone – Winner
Megan Abbott, BURY ME DEEP, Simon & Schuster
Max Allan Collins, QUARRY IN THE MIDDLE, HardCase Crime
Heather Gutenkauf, THE WEIGHT OF SILENCE, Mira
Frank Tallis, FATAL LIES, Random House Mortalis
L. C. Tyler, THE HERRING-SELLER’S APPRENTICE, Felony & Mayhem

BEST THRILLER
Jamie Freveletti, RUNNING FROM THE DEVIL, Morrow – Winner
Tom Cain, NO SURVIVORS (THE SURVIVOR), Viking
Mark Greaney, THE GRAY MAN, Jove
Derek Haas, COLUMBUS: a Silver Bear Thriller, Pegasus
Mike Lawson, HOUSE SECRETS, Atlantic Monthly
Greg Rucka, WALKING DEAD, Bantam

MYSTERY/CRIME NOVEL OF THE DECADE
Stieg Larsson, THE GIRL WITH THE DRAGON TATTOO, Knopf – Winner
Ken Bruen, THE GUARDS, St. Martin’s Minotaur
Michael Connelly, THE LINCOLN LAWYER, Little, Brown
Dennis Lehane, MYSTIC RIVER, Morrow
Louise Penny, STILL LIFE, St. Martin’s Minotaur
Carlos Ruiz Zafon, THE SHADOW OF THE WIND, Penguin Press

BEST SHORT STORY
Brendan DuBois, "The High House Writer" (AHMM July-August 2009) – Winner
Barbara Callahan, "My Mother's Keeper" (EQMM June 2009)
David Dean, "Erin's Journal" (EQMM December 2009)
John H. Dirckx, "Real Men Die" (AHMM September 2009)
Melodie Johnson Howe, "A Hollywood Ending" (EQMM July 2009)
Morley Swingle, "Hard Blows" (THE PROSECUTION RESTS )

The Don Sandstrom Award for Lifetime Achievement in Mystery Fandom
Len & June Moffat
Cap’n Bob Napier

*******

MACAVITY AWARD WINNERS 2010

Best Mystery Novel
TOWER by Ken Bruen and Reed Farrel Coleman (Busted Flush Press) – Winner

BURY ME DEEP by Megan Abbott (Simon & Schuster)
NECESSARY AS BLOOD by Deborah Crombie (Wm. Morrow)
NEMESIS by Jo Nesbø, translated by Don Bartlett (HarperCollins)
THE BRUTAL TELLING by Louise Penny (Minotaur)
THE SHANGHAI MOON by S.J. Rozan (Minotaur)

Best First Mystery Novel
THE SWEETNESS AT THE BOTTOM OF THE PIE by Alan Bradley (Delacorte) – Winner

RUNNING FROM THE DEVIL by Jamie Freveletti (Wm. Morrow)
A BAD DAY FOR SORRY by Sophie Littlefield (Minotaur)
THE GHOSTS OF BELFAST by Stuart Neville (Soho Crime)
A BEAUTIFUL PLACE TO DIE by Malla Nunn (Picador)

Best Mystery Nonfiction
TALKING ABOUT DETECTIVE FICTION by P.D. James (Alfred A. Knopf) – Winner

L.A. NOIR: The Struggle for the Soul of America's Most Seductive
City by John Buntin (Random House: Harmony Books)
ROGUE MALES: Conversations & Confrontations About the Writing Life
by Craig McDonald (Bleak House Books)
THE LINE UP: The World's Greatest Crime Writers Tell the Inside
Story of Their Greatest Detectives, edited by Otto Penzler (Little, Brown)
PROVENANCE: How a Con Man and a Forger Rewrote the History of
Modern Art by Laney Salisbury and Aly Sujo (Penguin Press)
DAME AGATHA’S SHORTS: An Agatha Christie Short Story Companion by
Elena Santangelo (Bella Rosa Books)

Best Mystery Short Story
“On the House” by Hank Phillippi Ryan in Quarry: Crime Stories by
New England Writers (Level Best Books) – Winner

“Last Fair Deal Gone Down” by Ace Atkins in Crossroad Blues (Busted
Flush Press)
“Femme Sole” by Dana Cameron in Boston Noir (Akashic Books)
“Digby, Attorney at Law” by Jim Fusilli, (AHMM, May 2009)
“Your Turn” by Carolyn Hart in Two of the Deadliest (Harper)
“The Desert Here and the Desert Far Away” by Marcus Sakey in
Thriller 2: Stories You Just Can’t Put Down (Mira)
“Amapola” by Luis Alberto Urrea in Phoenix Noir (Akashic Books)

Sue Feder Historical Mystery
A TRACE OF SMOKE by Rebecca Cantrell (Forge) – Winner

IN THE SHADOW OF GOTHAM by Stephanie Pintoff (Minotaur)
A DUTY TO THE DEAD by Charles Todd (Wm. Morrow)SERPENT IN THE THORNS by Jeri Westerson (Minotaur)
AMONG THE MAD by Jacqueline Winspear (Henry Holt)

**********

ANTHONY AWARD WINNERS 2010

BEST NOVEL
THE MYSTIC ARTS OF ERASING ALL SIGNS OF DEATH, Charlie Huston – Winner

THE LAST CHILD, John Hart
THE GIRL WHO PLAYED WITH FIRE, Stieg Larsson/trans. Reg Keeland
THE BRUTAL TELLING, Louise Penny
THE SHANGHAI MOON, S.J. Rozan

BEST FIRST NOVEL
A BAD DAY FOR SORRY, Sophie Littlefield – Winner

THE SWEETNESS AT THE BOTTOM OF THE PIE, Alan Bradley
STARVATION LAKE, Bryan Gruley
THE GHOSTS OF BELFAST, Stuart Neville
IN THE SHADOW OF GOTHAM, Stefanie Pintoff

BEST PAPERBACK ORIGINAL
STARVATION LAKE, Bryan Gruley – Winner

BURY ME DEEP, Megan Abbott
TOWER, Ken Bruen and Reed Farrel Coleman
QUARRY IN THE MIDDLE, Max Allan Collins
DEATH AND THE LIT CHICK, G.M. Malliet
AIR TIME, Hank Phillippi Ryan

BEST SHORT STORY
"On the House", Hank Phillippi Ryan – Winner

"Last Fair Deal Gone Down", Ace Atkins
"Femme Sole", Dana Cameron
"Animal Rescue", Dennis Lehane
"Amapola", Luis Alberto Urrea

BEST CRITICAL NONFICTION WORK
TALKING ABOUT DETECTIVE FICTION, P.D. James – Winner

THE LINE UP, Otto Penzler, ed.
HAUNTED HEART, Lisa Rogak
DAME AGATHA'S SHORTS, Elena Santangelo
THE TALENTED MISS HIGHSMITH, Joan Schenkar

*******

SHAMUS AWARD WINNERS 2010

Best Hardcover PI Novel
LOCKED IN by Marcia Muller (Grand Central) – Winner

THE SILENT HOUR by Michael Koryta (Minotaur/St. Martin's)
WHERE THE DEAD LAY by David Levien (Doubleday)
SCHEMERS by Bill Pronzini (Forge)
MY SOUL TO TAKE by Yrsa Sigurdardottir (William Morrow)

Best First PI Novel
FACES OF THE GONE by Brad Parks (Minotaur/St. Martin's) – Winner

LOSER’S TOWN by Daniel Depp (Simon & Schuster)
THE LAST GIG by Norman Green (Minotaur/St. Martin's)
THE GOOD SON by Russel D. McLean (Minotaur/St. Martin's)
CHINATOWN ANGEL by A.E. Roman (Minotaur/St. Martin's)

Best Paperback Original PI Novel
SINNER’S BALL by Ira Berkowitz (Three Rivers Press) – Winner

DARK SIDE OF THE MORGUE by Raymond Benson (Leisure Books)
RED BLOODED MURDER by Laura Caldwell (Mira)
VENGEANCE ROAD by Rick Mofina (Mira)
BODY BLOWS by Marc Strange (Dundurn)

Best PI Short Story
"Julius Katz" by Dave Zeltserman, Ellery Queen Mystery Magazine, September/October 2009 – Winner

"The Dark Island" by Brendan DuBois, BOSTON NOIR (Akashic)
"Deadline Edition" by S.L. Franklin, Alfred Hitchcock Mystery Magazine, April 2009
“Blazin' on Broadway" by Gary Phillips, PHOENIX NOIR (Akashic)
"Suicide Bonds" by Tim L. Williams, Ellery Queen Mystery Magazine, March/April 2009


Best P.I. Character
Sharon McCone (Sharon McCone series by Marcia Muller)

Lifetime Achievement Award
Robert Crais (Elvis Cole series, Joe Pike series)

********

CRIMESPREE MAGAZINE AWARDS

FAVORITE BOOK OF 2009

THE MYSTIC ARTS OF ERASING ALL SIGNS OF DEATH by Charlie Huston -- Winner
TRUST NO ONE by Gregg Hurwitz
BURY ME DEEP by Megan Abbott
TOWER by Ken Bruen & Reed Farrel Coleman
THE AMATEURS Marcus Sakey

FAVORITE FIRST BOOK 2009
EVEN by Andrew Grant –Winner

THE SWEETNESS AT THE BOTTOM OF THE PIE by Alan Bradley
RUNNING FROM THE DEVIL by Jamie Freveletti
A BAD DAY FOR SORRY by Sophie Littlefield
THE GHOSTS OF BELFAST by Stuart Neville

BEST IN AN ON-GOING SERIES FOR 2009
WALKING DEAD by Greg Rucka – Winner

THE SILENT HOUR by Michael Koryta
SHATTER by Michael Robotham
SHANGHAI MOON by SJ Rozan
TRUTH by Peter Temple

October 18, 2010

 

I'm off to Bouchercon next Wednesday, October 13. Hope to see some of your there. I'll be helping to man Mystery Mike's bookseller table in the dealer's room on Friday and Saturday while he goes to a family wedding. Come by and say hello if we don't cross paths beforehand.

October 9, 2010

 

CWA Awards 2010 Part Two

2010 CWA Gold Dagger Award

BLACKLANDS, Belinda Bauer (Corgi) – Winner

CONMAN, Richard Asplin (No Exit Press)
BLOOD HARVEST, S J Bolton (Bantam Press)
RAIN GODS, James Lee Burke (Orion)
SHADOWPLAY, Karen Campbell (Hodder & Stoughton)
THE STRANGE CASE OF THE COMPOSER AND HIS JUDGE, Patricia Duncker (Bloomsbury)
STILL MIDNIGHT, Denise Mina (Orion)
THE WAY HOME, George Pelecanos (Orion)

2010 CWA John Creasey (New Blood) Dagger Award

ACTS OF VIOLENCE, Ryan David Jahn (Pan) -- Winner

THE HOLY THIEF, William Ryan (Mantle)
CUT SHORT, Leigh Russell (No Exit Press)
MARTYR, Rory Clements (John Murray)
RANDOM, Craig Robertson (Simon & Schuster)
STOP ME, Richard Jay Parker (Allison & Busby)
RUPTURE, Simon Lelic (Picador)
THE PULL OF THE MOON, Diane Janes (Robinson)

2010 Ian Fleming Steel Dagger Award

A LOYAL SPY, Simon Conway – Winner

INNOCENT, Scott Turow (Mantle)
THE DYING LIGHT, Henry Porter (Orion)
THE GENTLEMEN’S HOUR, Don Winslow (Heinemann)

October 9, 2010

 

Some recent book news:

One of America's Best Kept Secrets. Edward Wright, winner of a CWA Dagger, Shamus, Ellis Peters and Barry Awards, is coming out in November (in the U.K. only -- so far) with a new stand-alone novel entitled FROM BLOOD. Minotaur published his last novel here in the U.S. so I hope that will be the case with FROM BLOOD. Plot: Shannon Fairchild, a brilliant but alienated young woman, loses her parents in a horrific double murder – then discovers that they were not her parents. She is the child, she learns, of two of America’s most wanted fugitives, anti-war militants who went underground after a fatal bombing in 1968 and never resurfaced. Propelled by the dying words of the woman who reared her, Shannon sets out on a mission to find her birth parents and warn them that someone is after them – someone much more dangerous than the FBI. Her search begins in California and ranges through much of America, from San Francisco to Chicago and from Montana to Seattle. As she unearths long-buried secrets while trying to stay one step ahead of a shadowy killer, she feels the passions of the tumultuous Sixties being reborn, and she now knows that nothing is more dangerous than someone willing to die for a cause.

21 Years of Writer's Block? More than a couple of decades ago I was a big fan of a trilogy written by Wessel Ebersohn which featured South African prison psychologist Yudel Gordon. The books had plots surrounding the then Apartheid of South Africa. The books are A LONELY PLACE TO DIE (1979), DIVIDE THE NIGHT (1981) and CLOSED CIRCLE (1990). They were very well written and I was sad that the author didn't continue the series -- until now. Another surprise on the doorstep. A newYudel Gordon novel entitled THE OCTOBER KILLINGS is coming out in January 2011 -- 21 years after the last one. The publicity materials bill it as "the first in a new series." It appears that the now retired Yudel Gordon is a secondary character in this "new series." Someone remarked that Africa is the new Scandinavia when it comes to crime fiction and this supports that opinion. I can see doing a cover article on the subject in a year or two.

I'll Go Kicking and Screaming into the Digital Age -- But I'll Go. I love the feel and heft of a good book. I like to manually turn the pages and view my bookmark to see how far I've gotten in my pleasure-filled journey through the tome. I really love collecting them and seeing them on my shelves. I have a hard time seeing myself reading a book on one of these new-fangled e-book readers such as Kindle or the I-Pad. (It's not just the reading of an e-book that disturbs me, but the thought of paying $10-14.00 for a book that I can't put on my shelf, but only exists on a Kindle or I-Pad.) But my clever wife just got a Kindle and really enjoyed reading Stieg Larsson's first two books on it. For the third she resorted back to my hard copy and complained that the big book was too heavy. So I think she is already a fan of the Kindle vs. the book. Michele is an expert at doing deals on the Internet and as a result I'll be getting an I-Pad for almost nothing (don't ask -- it's too complicated to replicate). I'm predicting that within a relatively short time, publishers will be sending advance reading copies as e-books over the Internet (it will save thousands of $$ each month in printing and mailing costs), so I'd better get used to it. Libraries and collectors will still demand hardcover books and e-book readers won't proliferate as fast as dvd players did, so there will still be a market for the paperback book as well, but we might as well get used to it -- the e-book is now here to stay, although I suspect that there will be some wars regarding format compatibility for awhile until one or two formats come out on top (think vhs vs. beta video recorders). The I-Pad already has partially solved that by offering a free Kindle app so I-Pad readers can access their Kindle-format books and read them on the I-Pad. And now a new development -- eminent thriller writer David Morrell has just announced that ten of his titles have come out in Kindle e-book format, one of which is an original thriller entitled THE NAKED EDGE, which I suspect is a sequel to my favorite David Morrell novel, THE PROTECTOR. So what happens when our favorite writers publish certain titles as e-books only!!! Gasp! Start saving your sheckles. I'll be shelling out $9.95 for THE NAKED EDGE because I'll just HAVE to read it, but it will kill me not being able to put it on my shelf afterwards. September 15, 2010

 

Thanks to all who participated in voting for this year's Barry Awards. The votes are in and the winners will be announced at this year's Bouchercon in San Francisco on Thursday, October 14th at approximately 7 pm as part of the Opening Ceremonies. Most winners were clear choices except for the Best British Novel category where five out of the six nominees were neck and neck to the end. In the Best First Novel, one title prevailed in early voting only to be beat out in the end by another title. It is an interesting experience to take the vote tally. It's like watching a race in slow motion. September 15, 2010

 

It's time to vote for the Barry Awards. Please e-mail me with your choices at george@deadlypleasures.com

Deadline: September 14, 2010

BARRY AWARD NOMINATIONS 2010

BEST NOVEL
John Connolly, THE GATES, Atria
David Ellis, THE HIDDEN MAN, Putnam
Joe Gores, SPADE & ARCHER, Knopf
John Hart, THE LAST CHILD, Minotaur
Marcia Muller, LOCKED IN, Grand Central
S.J. Rozan, SHANGHAI MOON, Minotaur

BEST FIRST NOVEL
Josh Bazell, BEAT THE REAPER, Little, Brown
Alan Bradley, THE SWEETNESS AT THE BOTTOM OF THE PIE, Delacorte
Rebecca Cantrell, A TRACE OF SMOKE, Forge
Sophie Littlefield, A BAD DAY FOR SORRY, Minotaur
Attica Locke, BLACK WATER RISING, Harper
Stuart Neville, THE GHOSTS OF BELFAST (THE TWELVE), Soho Crime

BEST BRITISH NOVEL
S. J. Bolton, AWAKENING, Bantam Press
John Connolly, THE LOVERS, HodderStoughton
Reginald Hill, MIDNIGHT FUGUE, HarperCollins
Philip Kerr, IF THE DEAD NOT RISE, Quercus
Denise Mina, STILL MIDNIGHT, Orion
Robert Wilson, IGNORANCE OF BLOOD, HarperCollins

BEST PAPERBACK ORIGINAL
Megan Abbott, BURY ME DEEP, Simon & Schuster
Max Allan Collins, QUARRY IN THE MIDDLE, HardCase Crime
Bryan Gruley, STARVATION LAKE, Touchstone
Heather Gutenkauf, THE WEIGHT OF SILENCE, Mira
Frank Tallis, FATAL LIES, Random House Mortalis
L. C. Tyler, THE HERRING-SELLER’S APPRENTICE, Felony & Mayhem

BEST THRILLER
Tom Cain, NO SURVIVORS (THE SURVIVOR), Viking
Jamie Freveletti, RUNNING FROM THE DEVIL, Morrow
Mark Greaney, THE GRAY MAN, Jove
Derek Haas, COLUMBUS: a Silver Bear Thriller, Pegasus
Mike Lawson, HOUSE SECRETS, Atlantic Monthly
Greg Rucka, WALKING DEAD, Bantam

MYSTERY/CRIME NOVEL OF THE DECADE
Ken Bruen, THE GUARDS, St. Martin’s Minotaur
Michael Connelly, THE LINCOLN LAWYER, Little, Brown
Stieg Larsson, THE GIRL WITH THE DRAGON TATTOO, Knopf
Dennis Lehane, MYSTIC RIVER, Morrow
Louise Penny, STILL LIFE, St. Martin’s Minotaur
Carlos Ruiz Zafon, THE SHADOW OF THE WIND, Penguin Press

BEST SHORT STORY
Barbara Callahan, "My Mother's Keeper" (EQMM June 2009)
David Dean, "Erin's Journal" (EQMM December 2009)
John H. Dirckx, "Real Men Die" (AHMM September 2009)
Brendan DuBois, "The High House Writer" (AHMM July-August 2009)
Melodie Johnson Howe, "A Hollywood Ending" (EQMM July 2009)
Morley Swingle, "Hard Blows" (THE PROSECUTION RESTS )

August 19, 2010

 

Some big-time writers have cancelled their Bouchercon attendance: John Harvey, Lawrence Block and Peter James. A recent sign-up who I'm anxious to meet is William Dietrich.

August 18, 2010

 

DP #62 is at the printer. Hope to mail Monday. Wheww!

Once again, I had trouble getting copies of the next Reviewed to Death title. They didn't come when promised and I had to call and e-mail to get them -- two weeks late. So contributors -- be aware that they are on the way to you now. I've extended the deadline to get the review back to me to October 1.

August 18, 2010

 

When I opened this week's issue of Newsweek, I found an unlikely defender of the mystery/thriller novel against literary snobs -- Jon Meacham, Editor of Newsweek. In his Editorial entitled, "Mysteries, Thrillers, And The Verities of the Heart," Mecham even attempts to distinguish between mysteries and thrillers: "Mysteries and thrillers are not the same things, though they are literary siblings. Roughly put, I would say the distinction is that mysteries emphasize motive and psychology, whereas thrillers rely more on action and plot. Some mysteries are thrillers and some thrillers are mysteries, but not all mysteries are thrillers and not all thrillers are mysteries."

His list of recommendations:

Rex Stout's Nero Wolfe

P.D. James

Denise Mina (a recommendation of Anna Quindlen)

Benjamin Black (John Banville)

Tana French

Henning Mankell

Arnaldur Indridason

Daniel Silva

David Ignatius

Charles McCarry

Alex Berenson

Lee Child

On the last page of the issue there is a very interesting comparison of books vs e-books.

August 7, 2010

 

There is a lot of talk about the mega-chain Barnes & Noble being sold. In reading a news clip about it, I learned that its founder, Mr. Riggio, owns about 30% of the company. He is looking into forming an investment group to buy a controlling interest in the company. Billionaire Ronald Burkle owns about 18% of the company. He has said that he is not interested in buying the company, but some doubt it.

To me this looks more like a re-arranging of ownership than a panic sale. Since B&N is the only store in town for me, I hope they stay in business. I don't buy a lot there but I look alot and do research for the magazine there. August 7, 2010

 

National Public Radio (NPR) has conducted a poll among its listeners and come up with the 100 Best Thriller List. Not a bad list but it does include quite a bit of horror (Stephen King, Dean Koontz, Peter Straub and Bram Stoker) that I probably wouldn't include. Lot's of recent titles as well. I'm inclined to go with the list of Best 100 Thrillers found in the new book edited by David Morrell, THRILLERS: 100 MUST READS, which isn't perfect but hits a lot of highlights. August 7, 2010

 

2010 CWA Gold Dagger Award Nominations

CONMAN, Richard Asplin (No Exit Press)
BLACKLANDS, Belinda Bauer (Corgi)
BLOOD HARVEST, S J Bolton (Bantam Press)
RAIN GODS, James Lee Burke (Orion)
SHADOWPLAY, Karen Campbell (Hodder & Stoughton)
THE STRANGE CASE OF THE COMPOSER AND HIS JUDGE, Patricia Duncker (Bloomsbury)
STILL MIDNIGHT, Denise Mina (Orion)
THE WAY HOME, George Pelecanos (Orion)

2010 CWA John Creasey (New Blood) Dagger Nominations

ACTS OF VIOLENCE, Ryan David Jahn (Pan)
CUT SHORT, Leigh Russell (No Exit Press)
MARTYR, Rory Clements (John Murray)
RANDOM, Craig Robertson (Simon & Schuster)
STOP ME, Richard Jay Parker (Allison & Busby)
RUPTURE, Simon Lelic (Picador)
THE HOLY THIEF, William Ryan (Mantle )
THE PULL OF THE MOON, Diane Janes (Robinson)

What happened to the good ol' days of five or six books per short list? Larry Gandle who usually reads and reviews the CWA Award nominations for DP looked at these lists and freaked out. As of now he doesn't plan to read the short lists. Too many books to get through in a short time.

July 29, 2010

 

2010 Theakstons Old Peculier Award goes to.....

A SIMPLE ACT OF VIOLENCE (Orion) - RJ Ellory

Congratulations to my good friend Roger, the classiest guy in mystery/crime fiction -- also a mighty fine writer.

In The Dark (Little, Brown) – Mark Billingham
The Surrogate (Little, Brown) – Tania Carver (Martyn Waites and wife)
The Crossing Places (Quercus) – Elly Griffiths
Dead Tomorrow (Pan) – Peter James
Gallows Lane (Macmillan) – Brian McGilloway
Doors Open (Orion)– Ian Rankin
Child 44 (Simon & Schuster) – Tom Rob Smith

 

Some of these books seem older than 2009 and the explanation is that this award looks at books published in paperback editions in 2009. July 29, 2010

 

Here are my favorite books of 2010 so far:

THE WOODCUTTER by Reginald Hill

THIRTEEN HOURS by Deon Meyer

THE REVERSAL by Michael Connelly

RED STAR RISING by Brian Freemantle

I'd be very interesting in hearing what your favorites of 2010 are. Please email me at george@deadlypleasures.com

July 29, 2010

 

I'm hard at work laying out DP 62. Excuse the delay. With my son going into the Marines I had a very hard time concentrating. But I'm back in form now.

Next Reviewed to Death: Greg Rucka's THE LAST RUN (Queen & Country). Will get the arcs early next week and send them out.

The following Reviewed to Death: Andrew Taylor's ANATOMY OF GHOSTS.

I always ask DP readers to read along with us, but never get any feedback as to if they do. If you do read either of these two books when they come out, let me know. July 29, 2010

 

I've now gotten the last Barry nominated short story posted.

Barbara Callahan, "My Mother's Keeper" (EQMM June 2009)
David Dean, "Erin's Journal" (EQMM December 2009)
John H. Dirckx, "Real Men Die" (AHMM September 2009)
Brendan DuBois, "The High House Writer" (AHMM July-August 2009)
Melodie Johnson Howe, "A Hollywood Ending" (EQMM July 2009)
Morley Swingle, "Hard Blows" (THE PROSECUTION RESTS )

There are some really good stories here. I highly recommend you take the time to read at least a few of them. I just finished the Brendan DuBois one which was a sheer delight. If you have a smartphone and get caught in a long line, read one of them while you are waiting. July 29, 2010

 

I got a nice surprise on Saturday when the mailman delivered Brian Freemantle's RED STAR RISING. It's the newest in the Charlie Muffin series, one of my favorites. I didn't know there was a new one coming out. The series started in 1977 and features a British intelligence officer, Charlie M, who doesn't fit in with his highly educated colleagues and often gets under their skin by doing things his own ingenious way. This is the 14th in the series so you can see that series additions come out very sporadically (14 books over 32 years). Most of the books involve the old Soviet Union so I thought that when the Berlin Wall fell and spy fiction took a nose-dive that we wouldn't be seeing more of Charlie M. But I was wrong. The author continued to find ways of making him relevant to the times. Now that Russia is again flexing its muscles and slipping back into its old ways, Charlie M is back, flat feet, Hush Puppies and all. If you haven't tried these books, you should. The writing is top notch and the plotting is deliciously woven to please and surprise. And then there is Charlie, one of the most endearing characters I've ever encountered. The complete set of first editions of this series is among my most prized possessions. 7/19/2010

 

Another Personal Note: My son's departure to the Marines was delayed until next Monday so his graduation will not interfere with my attending Bouchercon. That solved a lot of problems for me. Wheww! 7/19/2010

 

Personal Note: there's a lot going on with my family right now. Particularly with my 19-year-old son Jordan. A couple of months ago he signed up to be a Marine and because of the backlog of recruits right now he was scheduled to go to boot camp (Camp Pendleton) in October of this year. About a week ago two big things happened.

Jordan got engaged to his girlfriend Ali (no relation to Prince Ali Karim of mystery fandom fame) and he got a chance to go early to bootcamp. He leaves for boot camp on Monday the 19th of July. Boot camp is 13 weeks and parents are expected to attend a parent's day on Thursday and the graduation on Friday. If he leaves next Monday (which looks pretty certain right now) then his graduation will be the Friday of Bouchercon and the wedding the following week. I know that his graduation is much more important than Bouchercon but can't help being frustrated by the apparent timing conflict. True mystery fans will understand and be sympathetic. As of right now it looks like I'll arrive at Bouchercon around 4:30 on Friday.

I haven't been able to concentrate on anything this last week (lots of family get-togethers to say goodbye to Jordan), meeting Ali's parents, etc. So it looks like this upcoming issue of DP will be a little late. July 12, 2010

 

Thanks to Dell Publications I am able to post five of the short stories nominated for this year's Short Story Barry Award. Just click on the titles below to read the stories:

Barbara Callahan, "My Mother's Keeper" (EQMM June 2009)
David Dean, "Erin's Journal" (EQMM December 2009)
John H. Dirckx, "Real Men Die" (AHMM September 2009)
Brendan DuBois, "The High House Writer" (AHMM July-August 2009)
Melodie Johnson Howe, "A Hollywood Ending" (EQMM July 2009)
Morley Swingle, "Hard Blows" (THE PROSECUTION RESTS )

July 12, 2010

 

This from our current cover "boy" Deon Meyer:

I have to tell you about my mother.

I know, I know, it’s not the kind of blog subject you’ll expect from a South African crime author, but bear with me, it should all make sense in the end.

My mother. Eighty years old, sharp as a tack, still fiercely independent in her own apartment, a stone’s throw from the Milnerton beach near Cape Town. Every time I publish a new book, I duly deliver one to her, and then the ritual starts. Nowadays, it takes about two weeks before the call comes.

“Hello, my child,” she says.

I’m fifty-one years old, but I’m still ‘my child’.

“Hi, mom.” Bright and breezy, with feigned surprise, even though I know what’s coming. Long silence.

I wait.

Finally, with that exasperated tone of the failed parent: “I did not raise you like that.”

“I know, mom.”

“Where did you learn those words? Not from me, that’s for sure.”

“Of course not, mom.”

“What are my friends going to think? Did you consider that?”

“I’m sorry, mom …”

And when I finally and gently put down the receiver twenty apologetic minutes later, I wonder if I’m the only one. Did Connelly and Child, Barclay and Blunt, Rankin and Mankell get similar calls? Did they feel as guilty?

I mean, I’m fifty-one, for goodness sake.

July 1, 2010

 

The Bouchercon list of attending authors is being added to each week. Latest to sign up are Michael Connelly, Daniel Woodrell (I hope he comes this time -- he cancelled a previous Bouchercon appearance), Margaret Coel (haven't seen her for ages), Lawrence Block, Walter Mosely, John Connolly (glad he's coming because he's nominated for two Barry Awards), Michael Robotham and Declan Hughes. Not a bad list in and of itself. I wouldn't mind going to a convention even if these were the only attending authors. June 30, 2010

 

The Rap Sheet website has done a straw poll on the nominees for the Best Novel of the Decade Barry Award. Very interesting results. Worth looking at. June 30, 2010

 

Ever wonder what the fabled collection of Otto Penzler looks like? I have. But thanks to a recent article in The New York Times (with attendant photograph), my curiosity has been partially satisfied. 58,000 first editions!! Wow!! June 30, 2010

 

Remember an author by the name of Jack Kerley? His first three books (THE HUNDREDTH MAN, THE DEATH COLLECTORS and A GARDEN OF VIPERS -- all in the Carson Ryder series) were published between 2004-2006 to some critical acclaim. Then he seemed to have dropped off the scene. I just assumed that he had lost his contract and had stopped writing. Not so. He's just not published here in the U.S. There are four more novels in the Carson Ryder series, published in the U.K. under the name, J.A. Kerley.

BLOOD BROTHER (2008)

IN THE BLOOD (2009)

LITTLE GIRL LOST (2010)

BURIED ALIVE (2010). HarperCollins, 6.99. Plot: Soon after witnessing the escape of violent psychopath Bobby Crayline from prison, Alabaman detective Carson Ryder takes a rare break in the mountains. But his vacation is interrupted when an anonymous phone call summons him to the scene of a grisly murder.

With more savage killings, and the heavy-handed FBI only inflaming the situation, Ryder and local detective Donna Cherry sift through the increasingly bizarre clues. Is there more than one killer on the loose? And how does Carson’s clinically insane brother, Jeremy, now on the run, fit into the picture?

It is down to Ryder to unearth horrors from the past that others believe should remain buried…

June 14, 2010

 

There are always critics no matter how hard we try -- because when it comes to tastes and likes and dislikes we all differ. In choosing people for the Barry Award committees the only common denominator is that we all love mystery/crime fiction. But it is always a surprise to me when we come up with the final lists of nominees because the committee as a whole doesn't think like I do as an individual. Take for example the Barry Award nominations for Best Mystery/Crime Novel of the Decade. Someone called "kathy d." wrote regarding the Barry Award nominations on a blog called Lisa's Book critiques (http://lesasbookcritiques.blogspot.com/2010/06/barry-award-nominees.html) "I have actually read some of these myself and they are good books. But in the mystery of the decade, I think several heavy-hitters are absent." Think about it, a whole decade of mystery/crime novels condensed down to a mere six titles. Of course, any reader of mystery fiction will think that some "heavy hitters" have been left off. "How dare they leave off such and such title -- that was my favorite."

I don't do this with other Barry Award nominations, but with the Best of the Decade, here are the titles on our long list that didn't make the cut:

Reginald Hill, DIALOGUES OF THE DEAD

Lee Child, ONE SHOT

Jasper Fforde, THE EYRE AFFAIR

Arnaldur Indridason, JAR CITY

Joe Lansdale, THE BOTTOMS

Laura Lippman, EVERY SECRET THING

Thomas H. Cook, RED LEAVES

Alexander McCall Smith, THE NO. 1 LADIES DETECTIVE AGENCY

That would have made a pretty good list of Best of the Decade as well. If I had been choosing the list all by myself I know that the Reg Hill would be at the top of my list. I would also have included the Fforde and the Indridason. But that is why we do it by committee -- to get some concensus. June 11, 2010

 

Anyone who is a subscriber or a reader of Deadly Pleasures can vote for the Barry Awards. You can do it right now by e-mailing your choices to me at george@deadlypleasures.com or you can wait for the next issue to arrive and use the ballot enclosed therein and send it via mail or fax. 6/11/2010

 

Here are the Barry Award Nominations – finally. Please read through to the bottom as I have made a number of comments regarding them and the future nominating process.

BARRY AWARD NOMINATIONS 2010

BEST NOVEL
John Connolly, THE GATES, Atria
David Ellis, THE HIDDEN MAN, Putnam
Joe Gores, SPADE & ARCHER, Knopf
John Hart, THE LAST CHILD, Minotaur
Marcia Muller, LOCKED IN, Grand Central
S.J. Rozan, SHANGHAI MOON, Minotaur

BEST FIRST NOVEL
Josh Bazell, BEAT THE REAPER, Little, Brown
Alan Bradley, THE SWEETNESS AT THE BOTTOM OF THE PIE, Delacorte
Rebecca Cantrell, A TRACE OF SMOKE, Forge
Sophie Littlefield, A BAD DAY FOR SORRY, Minotaur
Attica Locke, BLACK WATER RISING, Harper
Stuart Neville, THE GHOSTS OF BELFAST (THE TWELVE), Soho Crime

BEST BRITISH NOVEL
S. J. Bolton, AWAKENING, Bantam Press
John Connolly, THE LOVERS, HodderStoughton
Reginald Hill, MIDNIGHT FUGUE, HarperCollins
Philip Kerr, IF THE DEAD NOT RISE, Quercus
Denise Mina, STILL MIDNIGHT, Orion
Robert Wilson, IGNORANCE OF BLOOD, HarperCollins

BEST PAPERBACK ORIGINAL
Megan Abbott, BURY ME DEEP, Simon & Schuster
Max Allan Collins, QUARRY IN THE MIDDLE, HardCase Crime
Bryan Gruley, STARVATION LAKE, Touchstone
Heather Gutenkauf, THE WEIGHT OF SILENCE, Mira
Frank Tallis, FATAL LIES, Random House Mortalis
L. C. Tyler, THE HERRING-SELLER’S APPRENTICE, Felony & Mayhem

BEST THRILLER
Tom Cain, NO SURVIVORS (THE SURVIVOR), Viking
Jamie Freveletti, RUNNING FROM THE DEVIL, Morrow
Mark Greaney, THE GRAY MAN, Jove
Derek Haas, COLUMBUS: a Silver Bear Thriller, Pegasus
Mike Lawson, HOUSE SECRETS, Atlantic Monthly
Greg Rucka, WALKING DEAD, Bantam

MYSTERY/CRIME NOVEL OF THE DECADE
Ken Bruen, THE GUARDS, St. Martin’s Minotaur
Michael Connelly, THE LINCOLN LAWYER, Little, Brown
Stieg Larsson, THE GIRL WITH THE DRAGON TATTOO, Knopf
Dennis Lehane, MYSTIC RIVER, Morrow
Louise Penny, STILL LIFE, St. Martin’s Minotaur
Carlos Ruiz Zafon, THE SHADOW OF THE WIND, Penguin Press

BEST SHORT STORY
Barbara Callahan, "My Mother's Keeper" (EQMM June 2009)
David Dean, "Erin's Journal" (EQMM December 2009)
John H. Dirckx, "Real Men Die" (AHMM September 2009)
Brendan DuBois, "The High House Writer" (AHMM July-August 2009)
Melodie Johnson Howe, "A Hollywood Ending" (EQMM July 2009)
Morley Swingle, "Hard Blows" (THE PROSECUTION RESTS )

Comments:
1. Good lists due to contributions of committees. Thanks to all for another year of great work.
2. I think that the Best First and Best Thriller lists are the strongest I’ve seen in quite some time.
As far as the Thriller list goes, the committee had a clear favorite (although I liked – and liked quite a bit – several of the other books on the list) and that was the paperback original THE GRAY MAN by Mark Greaney. If you like thrillers, with lots of action, you should pick up a copy. I’m not lobbying for this to win because the other books on the list are very deserving, but to alert you to a very good read.
3. It seems to me (I’ve not gone back to check) that female mystery writers are better represented on the lists this year than in years past.
4. Most of the short story authors are relative unknowns so I’m going to try and get permission to post the stories on the website so we can read them before voting. I haven’t done this for a few years.
5. Each year there are always some books that I really like that don’t make the cut, but I’m getting used to that. This year it was RIZZO’S WAR, which I seemed to like more than anyone on the committee (chalk that down to my New York roots). Also it was hard to cut Reginald Hill’s DIALOGUES OF THE DEAD from the best book of the decade list. It’s a monumental work in my eyes. But that’s why we have committees so that we come to a consensus of opinion.
6. It is my fault that we got these nominations out so late this year. I usually try to beat the Anthony and Macavity Awards so that we don’t look like we are copying anyone if there are similarities. Barbara Peters has made a suggestion that I’ve been mulling over for the last couple of weeks and I think I’ll try it to see how it works next year. That is to be the first to announce nominations in 2010, even beating the Edgar Award nominations. That would mean that we would have to get started in January, 2011. That would also require the committee members to pay closer attention to their reading and to the general buzz about books during 2010 – perhaps even keeping a running list of suggested titles for awards as we go along. And in keeping with that, I’m planning to do a cover article for the last issue of this year (Deadline: 12/1/2010), one just like we did two years ago in issue 56 where DP contributors recommend their favorite books of 2010 and 2009, an old favorite, and a guilty pleasure. I’m inviting all Barry Award nominating committee members to participate as well as all DP staff reviewers. 7. I want to thank Maggie Mason for all the help in tallying votes and finalizing the nominations. It was a great help and much appreciated. She’s volunteered to do it again next year.
8. Hope to see many of you at Bouchercon.

June 10, 2010

 

MACAVITY AWARD NOMINATIONS 2010

Best Mystery Novel
• Bury Me Deep by Megan Abbott (Simon & Schuster)
• Tower by Ken Bruen and Reed Farrel Coleman (Busted Flush Press)
• Necessary as Blood by Deborah Crombie (Wm. Morrow)
• Nemesis by Jo Nesbø, translated by Don Bartlett (HarperCollins)
• The Brutal Telling by Louise Penny (Minotaur)
• The Shanghai Moon by S.J. Rozan (Minotaur)

Best First Mystery Novel
• The Sweetness at the Bottom of the Pie by Alan Bradley (Delacorte)
• Running from the Devil by Jamie Freveletti (Wm. Morrow)
• A Bad Day for Sorry by Sophie Littlefield (Minotaur)
• The Ghosts of Belfast by Stuart Neville (Soho Crime)
• A Beautiful Place to Die by Malla Nunn (Picador)

Best Mystery Nonfiction
• L.A. Noir: The Struggle for the Soul of America's Most Seductive
City by John Buntin (Random House: Harmony Books)
• Talking about Detective Fiction by P.D. James (Alfred A. Knopf)
• Rogue Males: Conversations & Confrontations About the Writing Life
by Craig McDonald (Bleak House Books)
• The Line Up: The World's Greatest Crime Writers Tell the Inside
Story of Their Greatest Detectives, edited by Otto Penzler (Little, Brown &
Co)
• Provenance: How a Con Man and a Forger Rewrote the History of
Modern Art by Laney Salisbury and Aly Sujo (Penguin Press)
• Dame Agatha’s Shorts: An Agatha Christie Short Story Companion by
Elena Santangelo (Bella Rosa Books)

Best Mystery Short Story
• “Last Fair Deal Gone Down” by Ace Atkins in Crossroad Blues (Busted
Flush Press)
• “Femme Sole” by Dana Cameron in Boston Noir (Akashic Books)
• “Digby, Attorney at Law” by Jim Fusilli, (AHMM, May 2009)
• “Your Turn” by Carolyn Hart in Two of the Deadliest (Harper)
• “On the House” by Hank Phillippi Ryan in Quarry: Crime Stories by
New England Writers (Level Best Books)
• “The Desert Here and the Desert Far Away” by Marcus Sakey in
Thriller 2: Stories You Just Can’t Put Down (Mira)
• “Amapola” by Luis Alberto Urrea in Phoenix Noir (Akashic Books)

Sue Feder Historical Mystery
• A Trace of Smoke by Rebecca Cantrell (Forge)
• In the Shadow of Gotham by Stephanie Pintoff (Minotaur)
• A Duty to the Dead by Charles Todd (Wm. Morrow)
• Serpent in the Thorns by Jeri Westerson (Minotaur)
• Among the Mad by Jacqueline Winspear (Henry Holt)

June 9, 2010

 

 

ANTHONY AWARD NOMINATIONS

The 2010 Anthony Awards will be presented at the San Francisco Bouchercon's
Sunday Brunch, October 17. The nominees are:

BEST NOVEL

THE LAST CHILD, John Hart
THE MYSTIC ARTS OF ERASING ALL SIGNS OF DEATH, Charlie Huston
THE GIRL WHO PLAYED WITH FIRE, Stieg Larsson/trans. Reg Keeland
THE BRUTAL TELLING, Louise Penny
THE SHANGHAI MOON, S.J. Rozan

BEST FIRST NOVEL

THE SWEETNESS AT THE BOTTOM OF THE PIE, Alan Bradley
STARVATION LAKE, Bryan Gruley
A BAD DAY FOR SORRY, Sophie Littlefield
THE GHOSTS OF BELFAST, Stuart Neville
IN THE SHADOW OF GOTHAM, Stefanie Pintoff

BEST PAPERBACK ORIGINAL

BURY ME DEEP, Megan Abbott
TOWER, Ken Bruen and Reed Farrel Coleman
QUARRY IN THE MIDDLE, Max Allan Collins
STARVATION LAKE, Bryan Gruley
DEATH AND THE LIT CHICK, G.M. Malliet
AIR TIME, Hank Phillippi Ryan

BEST SHORT STORY

"Last Fair Deal Gone Down", Ace Atkins
"Femme Sole", Dana Cameron
"Animal Rescue", Dennis Lehane
"On the House", Hank Phillippi Ryan
"Amapola", Luis Alberto Urrea

BEST CRITICAL NONFICTION WORK

TALKING ABOUT DETECTIVE FICTION, P.D. James
THE LINE UP, Otto Penzler, ed.
HAUNTED HEART, Lisa Rogak
DAME AGATHA'S SHORTS, Elena Santangelo
THE TALENTED MISS HIGHSMITH, Joan Schenkar
June 4, 2010

 

A couple of news items:

Jeffrey Deaver has signed a contract to write the next James Bond novel.

Henning Mankell was on the flotilla of humanitarian aid for Gaza that was intercepted by Israeli forces, resulting in some deaths. It is thought that Henning Mankell was not killed in the action, but confirmation of that has not yet been forthcoming. (He is safe.) June 1, 2010

 

Interest in Bouchercon 2010 (San Francisco, October 14-17) is starting to heat up. The convention's list of attendees is being updated every week and the list of authors is getting more and more interesting and impressive. The latest addition is Kate Atkinson who graced our cover on issue 56 (WHEN WILL THERE BE GOOD NEWS?). Here are some of the attendees from the U.K. and Ireland: Kate Atkinson, Mark Billingham, Lindsey Davis, Carola Dunn, Andrew Grant, John Harvey, Lauren Henderson, David Hewson, Denise Mina, Stuart Neville, Rebecca Tope, Matt Hilton and Martyn Waites. I would include Lee Child in that group but somehow I think of him as American now.

Other key attendees are Donna Andrews, David Baldacci, James R. Benn, Brett Battles, Cara Black, Rhys Bowen, Robert Crais, Bill Crider, David Ellis, Meg Gardiner, Chris Grabenstein, Parnell Hall, Steve Hamilton, Steve Hockensmith, Mike Lawson, Paul Levine, John Lutz, Lisa Lutz, Sara Paretsky, Ridley Pearson, Louise Penny, S.J. Rozan, Steven Saylor, Michael Stanley (both authors), John Shannon, Karin Slaughter, Ron Tierney and Jacqueline Winspear.

There are also a slew of first time authors (some who have their second books just coming out) such as Jaimie Freveletti, Sophie Littlefield, Stuart Neville, Derek Haas and Bryan Gruley. Also lots of cozy mystery writers. To look at the complete list go to http://www.bcon2010.com/attendees.php

I always get excited to meet authors I haven't met previously. This year that includes David Baldacci, Kate Atkinson and Derek Haas. It's also nice to connect with writers I haven't seen in many years such as Steven Saylor (trying right now to set up lunch with him) and Robert Crais. At the end of the Madison Bouchercon I shared a ride to the airport with Denise Mina that was totally delightful. I hope to spend a few minutes with her, but inasmuch as she's a guest of honor that may be difficult.

But of course, Bouchercon just wouldn't be the wonderful experience it is every year without spending time with great friends in the fan world. I hope that Ali Karim will be able to make it this year. His business is booming and he has been working around the clock. Perhaps by then he'll take a much deserved break. June 1, 2010

 

I've accumulated some British first editions that I want to sell:

All are first editions, first printings and are in near fine condition:

Lee Child, 61 HOURS (true first edition) $26.00

Simon Kernick, THE LAST 10 SECONDS -- no U.S. edition. $25.00

Stephen Leather, NIGHTFALL -- no U.S. edition $25.00

And a trade paperback of a book published only in the U.K. A Fry/Cooper investigation.

Stephen Booth, THE KILL CALL $10.00

If you are interested, please e-mail me: george@deadlypleasures.com. Postage will be at cost. May 25, 2010

 

Some CWA Awards
Nowadays the CWA Awards are announced in drips and drabs. Here is the first drip.
Comments: The International Dagger is especially strong with the Indridason, Larsson and Meyer novels. Hard choice.
The Theakston Award list is puzzling to me as it seems to include books that are more than a year old, such as CHILD 44. Don’t know what time frame they are using.

CWA International Dagger (for fiction in translation):

Tonino Benaquista, BADFELLAS
Andrea Camilleri, AUGUST HEAT
Arnaldur Indridason, HYPOTHERMIA
Stieg Larsson, THE GIRL WHO KICKED THE HORNETS' NEST
Deon Meyer, THIRTEEN HOURS
Johan Theorin, THE DARKEST ROOM

CWA Dagger in the Library (given to an author for a body of work, chosen by librarians):

Simon Beckett
R.J. Ellory
Ariana Franklin
Mo Hayder
Denise Mina
Chris Simms

CWA Short Story Dagger:

Sean Chercover, "A Calculated Risk"
Jeffery Deaver, "The Weapon"
Robert Ferrigno, "Can You Help Me Out There"
Ridley Pearson, "Boldt’s Broken Angel"
Peter Robinson, "Like a Virgin"
Jon Land, "Killing Tim"
Simon Wood, "Protecting the Innocent"

The Daggers will be presented at the Theakstons Old Peculier Crime Writing Festival in Harrogate, Yorkshire, on Friday, July 23. At the same time, the Theakstons Old Peculier Crime Novel of the Year will be announced, and we congratulate the long list of nominees, announced last week. You can cast your own vote for the shortlist here: http://www.harrogate-festival.org.uk/crime/award/vote/
Mark Billingham, IN THE DARK
Duncan Campbell, IF IT BLEEDS
Tania Carver, THE SURROGATE
Martina Cole, THE BUSINESS
R.J. Ellory, A SIMPLE ACT OF VIOLENCE
Nicci French, UNTIL IT'S OVER
Elly Griffiths, THE CROSSING PLACES
John Harvey, COLD IN HAND
Mo Hayder, SKIN
Susan Hill, THE VOWS OF SILENCE
Declan Hughes, THE DYING BREED (U.S. title: ALL THE DEAD VOICES)
Peter James, DEAD TOMORROW
Simon Kernick, TARGET
Val McDermid, A DARKER DOMAIN
Brian McGilloway, GALLOWS LANE
Dreda Say Mitchell, GEEZER GIRLS
Caro Ramsay, SINGING TO THE DEAD
Ian Rankin, DOORS OPEN
Peter Robinson, ALL THE COLOURS OF DARKNESS
Tom Rob Smith, CHILD 44

May 25, 2010

 

Barry Award-winning Brett Battles (THE CLEANER) sent out a newsletter announcing today's publication of the paperback edition of his third book, SHADOW OF BETRAYAL. Other news: there will be no new book this year, but in 2011 there will be two books: " Yes, there is a new Quinn...tentatively entitled THE SILENCED, in which much of Quinn's past is revealed. To say this turns into Quinn's most personal assignment would be an understatement, a gigantic one.

"But prior to the new Quinn, I'm very excited to announce my first standalone will be released. NO RETURN is due to hit stores in April of next year.

"The crash of a Navy jet in the California desert. A pilot who, if only for a little while, is still alive. An aborted rescue by former local resident Wes Stewart. NO RETURN starts with a bang, and then...

"The next day, when Wes sees a picture in the paper purporting to be the pilot who had died, he stares at it in disbelief. Something is terribly wrong. This man is not the person he tried to rescue."

5/25/2010

 

I've just finished another wonderful reading experience. THE WOODCUTTER by Reginald Hill is a tour de force. Plot: From humble origins as a Cumbrian woodcutter's son, Wolf Hadda has risen to become a hugely successful entrepreneur, happily married to the girl of his dreams. A knock on the door one morning ends it all. Universally reviled, thrown into prison while protesting his innocence, abandoned by friends and family, Wolf retreats into silence. Seven years later prison psychiatrist Alva Ozigbo makes the breakthrough. Wolf begins to talk and under her guidance gets parole, returning to his rundown family home in rural Cumbria. But there is a mysterious period in Wolf's youth when he disappeared from home and was known to his employers as the Woodcutter. And now the Woodcutter is back, looking for the truth -- and with the truth, revenge.

I can't find any U.S. publication date for THE WOODCUTTER yet, but it will be available in the U.K. July 22nd. Now I have two favorites for 2010: THIRTEEN HOURS by Deon Meyer and THE WOODCUTTER by Reginald Hill. May 18, 2010

 

DP #61 was mailed yesterday. Whew! Always a big job. Now to catch up on things I've let slide. I hope you enjoy it when you get it. Today is my 37th wedding anniversary. May 18, 2010.

 

Trying to finish up DP #61. Other work and a nasty cold have interfered. I've decided on putting Deon Meyer on the cover. His new novel THIRTEEN HOURS is the best book I've read in 2010.

The next Reviewed to Death title is NOWHERE TO RUN by C.J. Box. Larry Gandle has already given me a oral review of it and he liked it a lot. It also got a starred review in each of the four library journals. If any of you wish, you may submit a review of it to me and I will consider printing it with the staff's reviews. April 30, 2010

 

Stuart Neville has won the L.A. Times Book prize for Best Mystery/Thriller with his THE GHOSTS OF BELFAST. Congratulations. 9/30/2010

 

It's Edgar Award time. Larry Gandle called from the Awards ceremony with the following:

EDGAR AWARD WINNERS

BEST NOVEL

THE LAST CHILD by John Hart (Minotaur Books) – Winner

THE MISSING by Tim Gautreaux (Random House - Alfred A. Knopf)
THE ODDS by Kathleen George (Minotaur Books)
MYSTIC ARTS OF ERASING ALL SIGNS OF DEATH by Charlie Huston (Random House - Ballantine Books)
NEMESIS by Jo Nesbø, translated by Don Bartlett (HarperCollins)
A BEAUTIFUL PLACE TO DIE by Malla Nunn (Simon & Schuster – Atria Books)

BEST FIRST NOVEL BY AN AMERICAN AUTHOR

IN THE SHADOW OF GOTHAM by Stefanie Pintoff (Minotaur Books) – Winner

THE GIRL SHE USED TO BE by David Cristofano (Grand Central Publishing)
STARVATION LAKE by Bryan Gruley (Simon & Schuster - Touchstone)
THE WEIGHT OF SILENCE by Heather Gudenkauf (MIRA Books)
A BAD DAY FOR SORRY by Sophie Littlefield (Minotaur Books – Thomas Dunne Books)
BLACK WATER RISING by Attica Locke (HarperCollins)

BEST PAPERBACK ORIGINAL

BODY BLOWS by Marc Strange (Dundurn Press – Castle Street Mysteries) – Winner

BURY ME DEEP by Megan Abbott (Simon & Schuster)
HAVANA LUNAR by Robert Arellano (Akashic Books)
THE LORD GOD BIRD by Russell Hill (Pleasure Boat Studio – Caravel Books)
THE HERRING-SELLER’S APPRENTICE by L.C. Tyler (Felony & Mayhem Press)

I'm very happy with the John Hart win. I think he's probably the best author to come along in a number of years. Each book a gem. Haven't read the other two winners so cannot comment, but Larry will in the upcoming issue of DP. Stay tuned. April 29, 2010

 

 

I'm always impressed when a particular novel garners four starred reviews -- one each from the four major library journals -- Publisher's Weekly, Booklist, Kirkus and Library Journal. (I thought Kirkus was going out of business, but it hasn't so far this year). Each year two or three books reach this concensus of excellence (although the books generally don't turn out to be award nominees or winners, as one might expect). So far in 2010, there are two books that have run the table. First novel THE POACHER'S SON by Paul Doiron (Minotaur, $24.99, April, 2010) and NOWHERE TO RUN by C.J. Box (Putnam, $25.95, April, 2010). Let me know if you agree. THE POACHER'S SON will be reviewed in the upcoming issue of DP. 4/01/2010

 

I reviewed very favorably THE BRICKLAYER by Noah Boyd. Of all of the Lee Child-wannabees, I thought this was the one that hit closest to the mark. It was disclosed from the outset that the name of the writer, "Noah Boyd," was a pen name of a retired FBI agent. Recently it has been disclosed that the retired FBI agent is none other than Paul Lindsay, author of six well-received novels. 4/01/2010

 

2010 Thriller Awards Nominees
International Thriller Writers announce the following nominations. Winners will be presented awards at this year’s ThrillerFest in New York City July 7-10, 2010


Best Hard Cover Novel:
VANISHED by Joseph Finder
LONG LOST by Harlan Coben
FEAR THE WORST by Linwood Barclay
THE NEIGHBOR by Lisa Gardner
THE RENEGADES by T. Jefferson Parker


Best Paperback Original:
SHADOW SEASON by Tom Piccirilli
URGE TO KILL by John Lutz
VENGEANCE ROAD by Rick Mofina
THE COLDEST MILE by Tom Piccirilli
NO MERCY by John Gilstrap


Best First Novel:
FRAGMENT by Warren Fahy
DEAD MEN'S DUST by Matt Hilton
COLLISION OF EVIL by John J. Le Beau
DRACULA: THE UN-DEAD by Dacre Stoker
RUNNING FROM THE DEVIL by Jamie Freveletti


Best Short Story:
THE DESERT HERE AND THE DESERT FAR AWAY by Marcus Sakey
A STAB IN THE HEART by Twist Phelan
AFTERSHOCK & OTHERS by F. Paul Wilson
ICED by Harry Hunsicker
BOLDT'S BROKEN ANGEL by Ridley Pearson

4/01/2010

 

There were four awards presented at the recent LeftCoast Crime convention in Los Angeles:

Dilys Award
(given out by the Independent Mystery Booksellers Association to “the mystery title of the year which the member booksellers have most enjoyed selling”)

THE SWEETNESS AT THE BOTTOM OF THE PIE by Alan Bradley (Delacorte)

A Quiet Belief in Angels by R.J. Ellory (Overlook)
The Dark Horse by Craig Johnson (Viking)
The Girl Who Played with Fire by Steig Larsson (Knopf)
The Ghosts of Belfast by Stuart Neville (Soho)
The Brutal Telling by Louise Penny (Minotaur)
The Shanghai Moon by S.J. Rozan (Minotaur)

The Lefty Award
(for a humorous mystery)

GETTING OLD IS A DISASTER by Rita Lakin (Dell)

Swan for the Money by Donna Andrews (Minotaur)
Living with Your Kids Is Murder by Mike Befeler (Five Star)
Strangle a Loaf of Italian Bread by Denise Dietz (Five Star)
High Crimes on the Magical Plane by Kris Neri (Red Coyote Press)

The Bruce Alexander Award
(for a historical mystery set before 1950)

A TRACE OF SMOKE by Rebecca Cantrell (Forge)

Tears of Pearl by Tasha Alexander (Minotaur)
In a Gilded Cage by Rhys Bowen (Minotaur);
Freedom’s Fight by Gary Phillips (Parker Publishing)
Serpent in the Thorns by Jeri Westerson

The Panik Award
(for L.A.-based noir, honoring deceased LCC 2010 chairman Paul Anik)

DEATH WAS IN THE PICTURE by Linda L. Richards (St. Martin’s Press)

Cemetery Road, by Gar Anthony Haywood (Severn House)
Trust No One, by Gregg Hurwitz (St. Martin’s Press)
Boulevard, by Stephen J. Schwartz (Forge) 03/26/2010

 

I posted the new DP List of the best books of 2010 so far. Go to the link "Year's Best Mysteries" 03/26/2010

 

I've been busy reading a number of titles for the cover article of the next issue of DP. One of them was 61 HOURS by Lee Child which is a real rollercoaster ride with a cliff-hanger ending. I thinks it's coming out in a month or so -- you'll want to pick it up. Another excellent read was CRASHERS by Dana Haynes (see below). There are others that I recommend but you'll have to wait for the new issue to find out what they are. 03/26/2010

 

Michael Robotham fans take note that his next novel, BLEED FOR ME, will be out in the U.K. in June. Plot: When Sienna Hegarty turns up at his family home one night, covered in blood and frozen in shock, psychologist Joe O'Loughlin finds himself drawn deep into her world, trying to unearth the dark secrets her mind has buried. The police find a major piece of the puzzle at Sienna's house: her father, a retired cop, is face-down in a pool of his own blood, his throat slashed and his skull caved in. The blood covering Sienna was his. The 14-year-old can't remember what happened that night but, at the same time, Sienna doesn't mourn her father's death. What was going on behind closed doors in the Hegarty household? Is Sienna guilty of brutal murder? And what part has her charismatic teacher Gordon Ellis played in this blood-soaked event?  03/26/2010

 

The first Bouchercon I attended was in Pasadena, California in 1991. I only knew one or two people who were attending but I had been compiling a reference work on mystery fiction entitled DEADLY PLEASURES (never published) and I used that to introduce myself to mystery authors at the convention. I would ask them to check their entry and see if all the information was correct. (It wasn't until the next convention I went to that I was almost instantly embraced by mystery fandom -- Maggie Mason, Don Sandstrom, Leila Dobscha, Marv Lachman, etc.)

I remember one of the authors whom I met that first year was Conrad Haynes, a very young man with a three-book series featuring Professor Harry Bishop (BISHOP'S GAMBIT DECLINED, PERPETUAL CHECK and SACRIFICE PLAY). If he attended another Bouchercon after that I don't recall, but I do know that he fell off the radar and hadn't published a book since.

Fast forward to last year's Bouchercon in Indiana. I'm standing in the lobby of the hotel with a group of friends and someone introduces me to Dana Haynes, who lo and behold, published three books many years ago under the name Conrad Haynes. (He still looks pretty young, by the way.) His new book is called CRASHERS (St. Martin's, July, 2010), which is a thriller about the investigation surrounding a major plane crash in Portland, Oregon. I'm 200 pages into it and quite enjoying the experience. Full review in the next issue.

What amazes me about this situation is I can't recall another author coming back from an almost 20-year hiatus. I think Dana will do very well with CRASHERS, though, because it is very well written and plotted. 2/14/2010

 

 

I just heard the news that another giant in the mystery field has passed away. Dick Francis died at the age of 89. I know he had been frail for many years so this passing does not come as a surprise.

In my early years I read a mystery or a thriller from time to time --Harry Kemelman (at the request of my mother) and Alistair MacLean. But I read mostly mainstream fiction, biography and history. I would never have considered myself a mystery fan.

Along about 1972 I started frequenting a paperback exchange bookstore in Salt Lake City which was managed by Mary Lynn Galway (who proofreads DP). I happened to be in the store at the same time as another gentleman who worked in the same office that I did. I got involved in a three-way conversation in which this gentleman and Mary Lynn strongly recommended that I read some Dick Francis novels. So I did. I can even remember the first one I read -- it was entitled NERVE. I liked it enough to try another -- and another -- and another -- until I was hooked and had read all of Dick Francis' work to that point. Then I started looking around for similar reading material -- and thus a mystery fan was born. Thank you, Dick, for starting me on a road I've enjoyed immensely for almost 40 years. 2/14/2010

 

DP #60 was mailed today, Friday, February 12. I looked at the mailing date of the last issue and today was a week less than 3 months from that date -- WOW! I actually got an issue out a little early. Only the domestic mailing was done today. I will mail the foreign tomorrow.
   

DP#60 went to the printer today. Hope to mail it by the end of the week (unlikely) or beginning of next week.

February 9, 2010

 

Some bad news and some good news. The bad news is that Robert B. Parker has passed away at age 77. He was not ill and his death was unexpected. He was found sitting at his desk. Source: Ali Karim

Now the good news -- from Larry Gandle. MWA has announced it nominees for the 2010 Edgar Awards. The ones of most interest to us are found below:

BEST NOVEL

THE MISSING by Tim Gautreaux (Random House - Alfred A. Knopf)
THE ODDS by Kathleen George (Minotaur Books)
THE LAST CHILD by John Hart (Minotaur Books)
MYSTIC ARTS OF ERASING ALL SIGNS OF DEATH by Charlie Huston (Random House - Ballantine Books)
NEMESIS by Jo Nesbø, translated by Don Bartlett (HarperCollins)
A BEAUTIFUL PLACE TO DIE by Malla Nunn (Simon & Schuster – Atria Books)

BEST FIRST NOVEL BY AN AMERICAN AUTHOR

THE GIRL SHE USED TO BE by David Cristofano (Grand Central Publishing)
STARVATION LAKE by Bryan Gruley (Simon & Schuster - Touchstone)
THE WEIGHT OF SILENCE by Heather Gudenkauf (MIRA Books)
A BAD DAY FOR SORRY by Sophie Littlefield (Minotaur Books – Thomas Dunne Books)
BLACK WATER RISING by Attica Locke (HarperCollins)
IN THE SHADOW OF GOTHAM by Stefanie Pintoff (Minotaur Books)

BEST PAPERBACK ORIGINAL

BURY ME DEEP by Megan Abbott (Simon & Schuster)
HAVANA LUNAR by Robert Arellano (Akashic Books)
THE LORD GOD BIRD by Russell Hill (Pleasure Boat Studio – Caravel Books)
BODY BLOWS by Marc Strange (Dundurn Press – Castle Street Mysteries)
THE HERRING-SELLER’S APPRENTICE by L.C. Tyler (Felony & Mayhem Press)

BEST FACT CRIME

COLUMBINE by Dave Cullen (Hachette Book Group - Twelve)
GO DOWN TOGETHER: The True, Untold Story of Bonnie and Clyde by Jeff Guinn (Simon & Schuster)
THE FENCE: A Police Cover-Up Along Boston’s Racial Divide by Dick Lehr (HarperCollins)
PROVENANCE: How a Con Man and a Forger Rewrote the History of Modern Art by Laney Salisbury and Aly Sujo (The Penguin Press)
VANISHED SMILE: The Mysterious Theft of Mona Lisa by R.A. Scotti (Random House - Alfred A. Knopf)

BEST CRITICAL/BIOGRAPHICAL

TALKING ABOUT DETECTIVE FICTION by P.D. James (Random House - Alfred A. Knopf)
THE LINEUP: The World’s Greatest Crime Writers Tell the Inside Story of Their Greatest Detectives edited by Otto Penzler (Hachette Book Group – Little, Brown and Company)
HAUNTED HEART: The Life and Times of Stephen King by Lisa Rogak (Thomas Dunne Books)
THE TALENTED MISS HIGHSMITH: The Secret Life and Serious Art of Patricia Highsmith by Joan Schenkar (St. Martin’s Press)
THE STEPHEN KING ILLUSTRATED COMPANION by Bev Vincent (Fall River Press)

BEST SHORT STORY

"Last Fair Deal Gone Down" by Ace Atkins, Crossroad Blues (Busted Flush Press)
"Femme Sole" by Dana Cameron, Boston Noir (Akashic Books)
"Digby, Attorney at Law" by Jim Fusilli, Alfred Hitchcock Mystery Magazine
"Animal Rescue" by Dennis Lehane, Boston Noir (Akashic Books
"Amapola" by Luis Alberto Urrea, Phoenix Noir (Akashic Books)

 

Good list this year. I wouldn't be surprised if 4 or 5 of the titles showed up on the Barry Award short lists.

January 19, 2010

 

 

News 2009

News 2008

News 2007

News from October/December 2006

News from July/Sept 2006

News from April/June 2006

News from Jan/Mar 2006